Point-of-care reduced phenolphthalein testing for occult blood contamination on glucose meters use at the community hospitals and primary care units in Phitsanulok, Thailand

Wanvisa B. Treebuphachatsakul, Sunanthinee Kongnun, Sirirat Meesang, Gerald J Kost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Blood contamination on glucose meters potentially can spread infectious agents that may lead to nosocomial infections. The goal of this study was to use reduced phenolphthalein as a point-of-care test at community hospitals and primary care units (PCUs) in Thailand for surveying on blood contamination on glucose meters. METHODS: Reduced phenolphthalein reagent was prepared and evaluated. Occult blood contamination was assessed on random 1154 glucose meters at 15 hospitals and 145 PCUs in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand, by using the reduced phenolphthalein method at the site of patient care in hospitals and PCUs. RESULTS: The analytical sensitivity of the reduced phenolphthalein was between 1:10 and 1:10. The reduced phenolphthalein showed reproducibility 100% when tested with undiluted whole blood and 95% when tested with diluted blood at 1:10. The reduced phenolphthalein also showed 70% to 100% negative when tested with nonheme agents and stability at least 10 days when the reagent was kept at room temperature. There were 55.6% of the glucose meters that exhibited occult blood contamination. Most of the blood contamination was found on the side of the meters (30%). Blood contamination on glucose meters used at PCUs was higher than on those used in hospitals (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that point-of-care reduced phenolphthalein testing has adequate sensitivity and precision for the detection of blood contamination on glucose meters. Point-of-care reduced phenolphthalein testing can be used conveniently for surveys of glucose meters contaminated. The results, which revealed significant levels of contamination, are clinically important because blood potentially can spread infectious agents that may lead to nosocomial infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-164
Number of pages4
JournalPoint of Care
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • blood contamination
  • blood identification
  • reduced phenolphthalein testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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