Plasma fatty acid ethanolamides are associated with postprandial triglycerides, ApoCIII, and ApoE in humans consuming a high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened beverage

Candice Allister Price, Donovan A. Argueta, Valentina Medici, Andrew A. Bremer, Vivien Lee, Marinelle V. Nunez, Guoxia X. Chen, Nancy L. Keim, Peter J Havel, Kimber Stanhope, Nicholas V. Dipatrizio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epidemiological and clinical research studies have provided ample evidence demonstrating that consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages increases risk factors involved in the development of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our previous study demonstrated that when compared with aspartame (Asp), 2 wk of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)-sweetened beverages provided at 25% of daily energy requirement was associated with increased body weight, postprandial (pp) triglycerides (TG), and fasting and pp CVD risk factors in young adults. The fatty acid ethanolamide, anandamide (AEA), and the monoacylglycerol, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), are two primary endocannabinoids (ECs) that play a role in regulating food intake, increasing adipose storage, and regulating lipid metabolism. Therefore, we measured plasma concentrations of ECs and their analogs, oleoylethanolamide (OEA), docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide (DHEA), and docosahexaenoyl glycerol (DHG), in participants from our previous study who consumed HFCS-or Asp-sweetened beverages to determine associations with weight gain and CVD risk factors. Two-week exposure to either HFCS-or Asp-sweetened beverages resulted in significant differences in the changes in fasting levels of OEA and DHEA between groups after the testing period. Subjects who consumed Asp, but not HFCS, displayed a reduction in AEA, OEA, and DHEA after the testing period. In contrast, there were significant positive relationships between AEA, OEA, and DHEA vs. ppTG, ppApoCIII, and ppApoE in those consuming HFCS, but not in those consuming Asp. Our findings reveal previously unknown associations between circulating ECs and EC-related molecules with markers of lipid metabolism and CVD risk after HFCS consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E141-E149
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume315
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

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Aspartame
Beverages
Apolipoproteins E
Endocannabinoids
Triglycerides
Fatty Acids
Cardiovascular Diseases
Lipid Metabolism
Fasting
Monoglycerides
Acids
Glycerol
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Gain
High Fructose Corn Syrup
Young Adult
Obesity
Eating
Body Weight
oleoylethanolamide

Keywords

  • Anandamide
  • ApoCIII
  • ApoE
  • High-fructose corn syrup
  • Oleoylethanolamide
  • Triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Plasma fatty acid ethanolamides are associated with postprandial triglycerides, ApoCIII, and ApoE in humans consuming a high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened beverage. / Price, Candice Allister; Argueta, Donovan A.; Medici, Valentina; Bremer, Andrew A.; Lee, Vivien; Nunez, Marinelle V.; Chen, Guoxia X.; Keim, Nancy L.; Havel, Peter J; Stanhope, Kimber; Dipatrizio, Nicholas V.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 315, No. 2, 01.08.2018, p. E141-E149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Price, Candice Allister ; Argueta, Donovan A. ; Medici, Valentina ; Bremer, Andrew A. ; Lee, Vivien ; Nunez, Marinelle V. ; Chen, Guoxia X. ; Keim, Nancy L. ; Havel, Peter J ; Stanhope, Kimber ; Dipatrizio, Nicholas V. / Plasma fatty acid ethanolamides are associated with postprandial triglycerides, ApoCIII, and ApoE in humans consuming a high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened beverage. In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2018 ; Vol. 315, No. 2. pp. E141-E149.
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