Plasma Electrolyte and Metabolite Concentrations Associated with Pentobarbital or Pentobarbital-Propofol Anesthesia during Three Weeks' Mechanical Ventilation and Intensive Care in Dogs

Gerald A. Gronert, Steve C. Haskins, Eugene Steffey, Dennis Fung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Propofol and pentobarbital were used for deep sedation during prolonged mechanical ventilation (3 weeks) and nutritional supplementation in 17 clinically normal dogs in an intensive care setting. Tolerance developed to both drugs. Propofol, in combination with pentobarbital, at an infusion rate of 75 μg/kg of body weight per minute was preferred. Pentobarbital infusion alone, begun at the rate of 5 to 6 mg·kg-1·h-1, was satisfactory. The combination of both drugs provided smooth, stable anesthesia and required minimal interventions by intensive care unit personnel. Blood gas tensions and electrolyte, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and metabolite concentrations were generally stable throughout, unless condition of the dog deteriorated (e.g., infection, pneumothorax). Hematocrit and red blood cell count decreased with time, likely attributable principally to multiple blood sample collections. White blood cell count, alkaline phosphatase, phosphate, fibrinogen, cholesterol, and triglyceride values increased with time, in association with pentobarbital and the combination of pentobarbital and propofol. Some of these changes appear to have been related to generic responses to stress and inflammation, some to altered metabolism, and some to the lipid solvent of propofol. The increase in triglyceride concentration was greater when propofol was used. Mortality was 47%, with death occurring between days 2 and 18.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-519
Number of pages7
JournalLaboratory Animal Science
Volume48
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

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pentobarbital
Propofol
Pentobarbital
Critical Care
Metabolites
Artificial Respiration
Electrolytes
electrolytes
anesthesia
Anesthesia
Dogs
metabolites
Plasmas
Blood
dogs
Triglycerides
triacylglycerols
Cells
Deep Sedation
pneumothorax

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Plasma Electrolyte and Metabolite Concentrations Associated with Pentobarbital or Pentobarbital-Propofol Anesthesia during Three Weeks' Mechanical Ventilation and Intensive Care in Dogs. / Gronert, Gerald A.; Haskins, Steve C.; Steffey, Eugene; Fung, Dennis.

In: Laboratory Animal Science, Vol. 48, No. 5, 01.12.1998, p. 513-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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