Planum temporale: Where spoken and written language meet

Tsutomu Nakada, Yukihiko Fujii, Yuichiro Yoneoka, Ingrid Kwee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies on spoken versus written language processing were performed in 20 right-handed normal volunteers on a high-field (3.0-tesla) system. The areas activated in common by both auditory (listening) and visual (reading) language comprehension paradigms were mapped onto the planum temporale (20/20), primary auditory region (2/20), superior temporal sulcus area (2/20) and planum parietale (3/20). The study indicates that the planum temporale represents a common traffic area for cortical processing which needs to access the system of language comprehension. The destruction of this area can result in comprehension deficits in both spoken and written language, i.e. a classical case of Wernicke's aphasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-125
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Neurology
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Keywords

  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • High-field system
  • Language
  • Planum parietale
  • Planum temporale
  • Spoken language
  • Wernicke's aphasia
  • Written language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Planum temporale : Where spoken and written language meet. / Nakada, Tsutomu; Fujii, Yukihiko; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Kwee, Ingrid.

In: European Neurology, Vol. 46, No. 3, 2001, p. 121-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakada, Tsutomu ; Fujii, Yukihiko ; Yoneoka, Yuichiro ; Kwee, Ingrid. / Planum temporale : Where spoken and written language meet. In: European Neurology. 2001 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 121-125.
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