Pituitary tumor size, neurologic signs, and relation to endocrine test results in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism: 43 cases (1980-1990).

B. S. Kipperman, Edward C Feldman, N. O. Dybdal, Richard W Nelson

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Abstract

Pituitary neoplasm was identified in 43 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism via necropsy (n = 33), diagnostic imaging with computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 5), or diagnostic imaging and necropsy (n = 5). All dogs had clinical signs and clinicopathologic test results typical of hyperadrenocorticism. Thirty-seven dogs had grossly visible pituitary tumors, and 6 dogs had microscopic pituitary tumors. Fifteen dogs had developed neurologic signs typical of those resulting from an enlarging pituitary mass. Twenty-three dogs had pituitary tumors greater than or equal to 1 cm in diameter. Provocative testing of the pituitary-adrenocortical axis was performed on all dogs. Dogs with grossly visible pituitary tumors and dogs with neurologic signs had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher mean plasma endogenous ACTH concentrations, compared with values from dogs with microscopic tumors and dogs without neurologic signs, respectively. Dogs with grossly visible pituitary tumors and dogs with tumors greater than or equal to 1 cm in diameter had significantly (P less than 0.05) lower adrenocortical responsiveness to exogenous ACTH, compared with dogs with microscopic pituitary tumors and dogs with tumors less than 1 cm in diameter, respectively. Despite these differences, there was overlap between test results among dogs. On the basis of endocrine test results, it would appear difficult to distinguish dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and large pituitary tumors from those with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and microscopic pituitary tumors prior to onset of neurologic signs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-767
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume201
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 1992

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Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
Nervous System Neoplasms
hyperadrenocorticism
Pituitary Neoplasms
Neurologic Manifestations
nervous system
Dogs
neoplasms
dogs
testing
Diagnostic Imaging
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
necropsy
image analysis
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Pituitary tumor size, neurologic signs, and relation to endocrine test results in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism: 43 cases (1980-1990).",
abstract = "Pituitary neoplasm was identified in 43 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism via necropsy (n = 33), diagnostic imaging with computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 5), or diagnostic imaging and necropsy (n = 5). All dogs had clinical signs and clinicopathologic test results typical of hyperadrenocorticism. Thirty-seven dogs had grossly visible pituitary tumors, and 6 dogs had microscopic pituitary tumors. Fifteen dogs had developed neurologic signs typical of those resulting from an enlarging pituitary mass. Twenty-three dogs had pituitary tumors greater than or equal to 1 cm in diameter. Provocative testing of the pituitary-adrenocortical axis was performed on all dogs. Dogs with grossly visible pituitary tumors and dogs with neurologic signs had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher mean plasma endogenous ACTH concentrations, compared with values from dogs with microscopic tumors and dogs without neurologic signs, respectively. Dogs with grossly visible pituitary tumors and dogs with tumors greater than or equal to 1 cm in diameter had significantly (P less than 0.05) lower adrenocortical responsiveness to exogenous ACTH, compared with dogs with microscopic pituitary tumors and dogs with tumors less than 1 cm in diameter, respectively. Despite these differences, there was overlap between test results among dogs. On the basis of endocrine test results, it would appear difficult to distinguish dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and large pituitary tumors from those with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and microscopic pituitary tumors prior to onset of neurologic signs.",
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