Pilot Study: EatFit Impacts Sixth Graders' Academic Performance on Achievement of Mathematics and English Education Standards

Mical Kay Shilts, Cathi Lamp, Marcel Horowitz, Marilyn S. Townsend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Investigate the impact of a nutrition education program on student academic performance as measured by achievement of education standards. Design: Quasi-experimental crossover-controlled study. Setting: California Central Valley suburban elementary school (58% qualified for free or reduced-priced lunch). Participants: All sixth-grade students (n = 84) in the elementary school clustered in 3 classrooms. Intervention: 9-lesson intervention with an emphasis on guided goal setting and driven by the Social Cognitive Theory. Main Outcome Measure: Multiple-choice survey assessing 5 education standards for sixth-grade mathematics and English at 3 time points: baseline (T1), 5 weeks (T2), and 10 weeks (T3). Analysis: Repeated measures, paired t test, and analysis of covariance. Results: Changes in total scores were statistically different (P < .05), with treatment scores (T3 - T2) generating more gains. The change scores for 1 English (P < .01) and 2 mathematics standards (P < .05; P < .001) were statistically greater for the treatment period (T3 - T2) compared to the control period (T2 - T1). Conclusion and Implications: Using standardized tests, results of this pilot study suggest that EatFit can improve academic performance measured by achievement of specific mathematics and English education standards. Nutrition educators can show school administrators and wellness committee members that this program can positively impact academic performance, concomitant to its primary objective of promoting healthful eating and physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-131
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

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Mathematics
Education
Committee Membership
Students
Lunch
Administrative Personnel
Cross-Over Studies
Research Design
Eating
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Exercise
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • academic performance
  • adolescents
  • content standards
  • nutrition education
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Pilot Study : EatFit Impacts Sixth Graders' Academic Performance on Achievement of Mathematics and English Education Standards. / Shilts, Mical Kay; Lamp, Cathi; Horowitz, Marcel; Townsend, Marilyn S.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 41, No. 2, 03.2009, p. 127-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shilts, Mical Kay ; Lamp, Cathi ; Horowitz, Marcel ; Townsend, Marilyn S. / Pilot Study : EatFit Impacts Sixth Graders' Academic Performance on Achievement of Mathematics and English Education Standards. In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2009 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 127-131.
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