Pilot feasibility study of the method of water infusion without air insufflation in sedated colonoscopy

Joseph Leung, Rodolei Salera, Lee Toomsen, Surinder K Mann, Felix W. Leung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One study in sedated patients demonstrated a reduction in pain score but not midazolam dosage when warm water infusion was used to manage colonic spasm. We describe pilot data with a modified warm water infusion technique. We tested the hypothesis that patients receiving even only half of the usual dose of sedation medications would have acceptable cecal intubation and tolerate the procedure well, based on retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a single Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center. Group 1 included 32 consecutive patients who received full-dose and group 2 included 43 consecutive patients who received half-dose premedication. Insertion of colonoscope was aided by warm water infusion in lieu of air insufflation. Pain scores during insertion, cecal intubation rate, and total amount of medications were monitored. The novel technique permitted equal cecal intubation rate at reduced total dose of medications. Pain scores were not significantly different. The uncontrolled nonrandomized observational nature of the data is one limitation. The nonsignificant difference in pain scores may be affected by a type II error. These pilot data suggest that insertion is feasible without air when water infusion is used. The novel technique may be a useful adjunct for minimizing the dosage of sedation medications without adversely affecting cecal intubation. Further study is needed to compare air insufflation and water infusion with regard to patient tolerance and success, particularly in the presence of an on-demand sedation policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1997-2001
Number of pages5
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume54
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Insufflation
Feasibility Studies
Colonoscopy
Intubation
Air
Water
Pain
Colonoscopes
Premedication
Midazolam
Spasm
Veterans

Keywords

  • Colonoscopy
  • CRC screening
  • Medication
  • Sedation
  • Warm water infusion
  • Water infusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Pilot feasibility study of the method of water infusion without air insufflation in sedated colonoscopy. / Leung, Joseph; Salera, Rodolei; Toomsen, Lee; Mann, Surinder K; Leung, Felix W.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 54, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 1997-2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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