Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells

Qiyin Fang, Jingjing Wang, Yinghua Sun, Thomas Vernier, Thanassis Papaioannou, Javier Jo, Mya Mya Thu, Martin Gundersen, Laura Marcu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this communication, we report the imaging of living glioma cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) technique. The growing interests in developing novel techniques for diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy of brain tumor have led to microscopic studies of subcellular structures and intracellular processes in glioma cells. Fluorescence microscopy has been used with a number of exogenous molecular probes specific for certain intracellular structures such as mitochondria, peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), and calcium concentration. When probes with overlapping emission spectra being used, separate samples are required to image each probe individually under conventional fluorescence microscopy. We have developed a wide-field FLIM microscope that uses fluorescence lifetime as an additional contrast for resolving multiple markers in the same essay. The FLIM microscope consists of a violet diode laser and a nitrogen-pumped dye laser to provide tunable sub-nanosecond excitation from UV to NIR. The detection system is based on a time-gated ICCD camera with minimum 80 ps gate width. The performance of the system was evaluated using fluorescence dyes with repotted lifetime values. Living rat glioma C6 cells were stained with JC-1 and Rhodamine 123. FLIM images were acquired and their lifetimes in living cells were found in good agreements with values measured in solutions by a time-domain fluorescence spectrometer. These results indicate that imaging of glioma cells using FLIM can resolve multiple spectrally-overlapping probes and provide quantitative functional information about the intracellular environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
EditorsD.V. Nicolau, J. Enderlein, R.C. Leif, D.L. Farkas, R. Raghavachari
Pages33-39
Number of pages7
Volume5699
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
EventImaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules and Cells: Fundamentals and Applications III - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 24 2005Jan 27 2005

Other

OtherImaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules and Cells: Fundamentals and Applications III
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/24/051/27/05

Fingerprint

Microscopes
Fluorescence
Imaging techniques
Fluorescence microscopy
Mitochondria
Dye lasers
Semiconductor lasers
Spectrometers
Rats
Tumors
Calcium
Brain
Dyes
Cameras
Cells
Nitrogen
Communication

Keywords

  • Fluorescence
  • Fluorescence lifetime imaging
  • Glioma
  • Laser-induced
  • Microscopy
  • Time-resolved

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Fang, Q., Wang, J., Sun, Y., Vernier, T., Papaioannou, T., Jo, J., ... Marcu, L. (2005). Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells. In D. V. Nicolau, J. Enderlein, R. C. Leif, D. L. Farkas, & R. Raghavachari (Eds.), Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 5699, pp. 33-39). [05] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.592474

Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells. / Fang, Qiyin; Wang, Jingjing; Sun, Yinghua; Vernier, Thomas; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Jo, Javier; Thu, Mya Mya; Gundersen, Martin; Marcu, Laura.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. ed. / D.V. Nicolau; J. Enderlein; R.C. Leif; D.L. Farkas; R. Raghavachari. Vol. 5699 2005. p. 33-39 05.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Fang, Q, Wang, J, Sun, Y, Vernier, T, Papaioannou, T, Jo, J, Thu, MM, Gundersen, M & Marcu, L 2005, Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells. in DV Nicolau, J Enderlein, RC Leif, DL Farkas & R Raghavachari (eds), Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 5699, 05, pp. 33-39, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules and Cells: Fundamentals and Applications III, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/24/05. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.592474
Fang Q, Wang J, Sun Y, Vernier T, Papaioannou T, Jo J et al. Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells. In Nicolau DV, Enderlein J, Leif RC, Farkas DL, Raghavachari R, editors, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 5699. 2005. p. 33-39. 05 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.592474
Fang, Qiyin ; Wang, Jingjing ; Sun, Yinghua ; Vernier, Thomas ; Papaioannou, Thanassis ; Jo, Javier ; Thu, Mya Mya ; Gundersen, Martin ; Marcu, Laura. / Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. editor / D.V. Nicolau ; J. Enderlein ; R.C. Leif ; D.L. Farkas ; R. Raghavachari. Vol. 5699 2005. pp. 33-39
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