Phytohemagglutinin-inducible p24 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a predictor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vertical transmission and infant clinical status

J. J. Farley, Gerhard Bauer, J. P. Johnson, G. A. Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We sought to determine whether the detectability of phytohemagglutinin- inducible p24 (PHA-p24) in short term cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with an increased risk of vertical transmission among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women and more severe symptomatology among HIV-1-infected infants. The assay for PHA- p24 was performed on specimens obtained from HIV-1-infected women during their pregnancy and from infants during the first 6 months of life. Infants were followed prospectively to determine HIV-1 infection outcome and symptomatology. Among PHA-p24 positive women 9 of 19 (47.4%) gave birth to HIV-1-infected infants compared with 4 of 25 (16.0%) of PHA-p24-negative women (P = 0.02). Among women who tested PHA-p24-positive and had a CD4+ lymphocyte count <500 cells/mm3, 8 of 15 (53.3%) gave birth to HIV-1- infected infants compared with 4 of 26 (15.4%) not meeting these conditions (P = 0.01). Among HIV-1-infected infants 4 of 5 (80%) of those testing PHA- p24-positive by one month of age developed an opportunistic infection or encephalopathy by 12 months of age, compared with none of the 11 infants testing PHA-p24-negative (P = 0.003). We conclude that PHA-p24 may be a useful in vitro measure for increased risk of vertical transmission among HIV-1-infected pregnant women and increased risk for rapid development of severe disease among HIV-1-infected infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1079-1082
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume13
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection
  • infant symptomatology
  • vertical transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

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