Physiological levels of hydrostatic pressure alter morphology and organization of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins in MG-63 osteosarcoma cells.

C. Haskin, I. Cameron, K. Athanasiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

The response of human MG-63 osteosarcoma cells to physiological levels of hydrostatic pressure was studied. Cell cultures were subjected to a 20-min, 4-MPa hydrostatic pressure pulse. Adhesion was measured at 20 min and 2 h post-hydrostatic pressure. Morphometric measurements of cell shape and immunofluorescent assays of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins were done pre- and post-hydrostatic pressure. Pressure-treated cells showed increased adhesion (resistance to deadhesion by trypsinization)-with increased recovery time. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated increased heterotypic adhesion receptor at cell-cell interfaces and increased alpha 3, beta 1-integrin at cell-substrate interfaces. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated depolymerization of alpha-tubulin, vimentin, and actin during the pressure pulse. Actin reorganization was slower than that of alpha-tubulin and vimentin, with stress filaments not well organized even after 1 h postpressure. The depolymerization of alpha-tubulin, vimentin, and actin observed at relatively low levels of hydrostatic pressure suggests disintegration of the integrin-cytoskeletal attachment complex. The increased resistance of the cells to trypsinization and the increase in both heterotypic adhesion receptor and the alpha 3, beta 1-integrin at cell interfaces suggest that cells compensate for loss of cytoskeletal integrity by increasing attachment to both adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-35
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire
Volume71
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - Jan 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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