Physiological levels of hydrostatic pressure alter morphology and organization of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins in MG-63 osteosarcoma cells.

C. Haskin, I. Cameron, K. Athanasiou

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Abstract

The response of human MG-63 osteosarcoma cells to physiological levels of hydrostatic pressure was studied. Cell cultures were subjected to a 20-min, 4-MPa hydrostatic pressure pulse. Adhesion was measured at 20 min and 2 h post-hydrostatic pressure. Morphometric measurements of cell shape and immunofluorescent assays of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins were done pre- and post-hydrostatic pressure. Pressure-treated cells showed increased adhesion (resistance to deadhesion by trypsinization)-with increased recovery time. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated increased heterotypic adhesion receptor at cell-cell interfaces and increased alpha 3, beta 1-integrin at cell-substrate interfaces. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated depolymerization of alpha-tubulin, vimentin, and actin during the pressure pulse. Actin reorganization was slower than that of alpha-tubulin and vimentin, with stress filaments not well organized even after 1 h postpressure. The depolymerization of alpha-tubulin, vimentin, and actin observed at relatively low levels of hydrostatic pressure suggests disintegration of the integrin-cytoskeletal attachment complex. The increased resistance of the cells to trypsinization and the increase in both heterotypic adhesion receptor and the alpha 3, beta 1-integrin at cell interfaces suggest that cells compensate for loss of cytoskeletal integrity by increasing attachment to both adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-35
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire
Volume71
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - Jan 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Hydrostatic Pressure
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Osteosarcoma
Hydrostatic pressure
Adhesion
Integrin alpha3beta1
Vimentin
Tubulin
Actins
Depolymerization
Proteins
Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Disintegration
Cell culture
Integrins
Assays
Cells
Cell Shape
Recovery
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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abstract = "The response of human MG-63 osteosarcoma cells to physiological levels of hydrostatic pressure was studied. Cell cultures were subjected to a 20-min, 4-MPa hydrostatic pressure pulse. Adhesion was measured at 20 min and 2 h post-hydrostatic pressure. Morphometric measurements of cell shape and immunofluorescent assays of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins were done pre- and post-hydrostatic pressure. Pressure-treated cells showed increased adhesion (resistance to deadhesion by trypsinization)-with increased recovery time. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated increased heterotypic adhesion receptor at cell-cell interfaces and increased alpha 3, beta 1-integrin at cell-substrate interfaces. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated depolymerization of alpha-tubulin, vimentin, and actin during the pressure pulse. Actin reorganization was slower than that of alpha-tubulin and vimentin, with stress filaments not well organized even after 1 h postpressure. The depolymerization of alpha-tubulin, vimentin, and actin observed at relatively low levels of hydrostatic pressure suggests disintegration of the integrin-cytoskeletal attachment complex. The increased resistance of the cells to trypsinization and the increase in both heterotypic adhesion receptor and the alpha 3, beta 1-integrin at cell interfaces suggest that cells compensate for loss of cytoskeletal integrity by increasing attachment to both adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix.",
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AU - Athanasiou, K.

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