Physiological factors associated with the lower maximal oxygen consumption of master runners

A. M. Rivera, A. E. Pels, S. P. Sady, M. A. Sady, E. M. Cullinane, P. D. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the hemodynamic factors associated with the lower maximal O 2 consumption (V̇O(2max)) in older formerly elite distance runners. Heart rate and V̇O 2 were measured during submaximal and maximal treadmill exercise in 11 master [66 ± 8 (SD) yr] and 11 young (32 ± 5 yr) male runners. Cardiac output was determined using acetylene rebreathing at 30, 50, 70, and 85% V̇O(2max). Maximal cardiac output was estimated using submaximal stroke volume and maximal heart rate. V̇O(2max) was 36% lower in master runners (45.0 ± 6.9 vs. 70.4 ± 8.0 ml·kg -1·min -1, P ≤ 0.05), because of both a lower maximal cardiac output (18.2 ± 3.5 vs. 25.4 ± 1.7 l·min -1) and arteriovenous O 2 difference (16.6 ± 1.6 vs. 18.7 ± 1.4 ml O 2·100 ml blood -1, P ≤ 0.05). Reduced maximal heart rate (154.4 ± 17.4 vs. 185 ± 5.8 beats·min -1) and stroke volume (117.1 ± 16.1 vs. 137.2 ± 8.7 ml·beat -1) contributed to the lower cardiac output in the older athletes (P ≤ 0.05). These data indicate that V̇O(2max) is lower in master runners because of a diminished capacity to deliver and extract O 2 during exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-954
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume66
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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    Rivera, A. M., Pels, A. E., Sady, S. P., Sady, M. A., Cullinane, E. M., & Thompson, P. D. (1989). Physiological factors associated with the lower maximal oxygen consumption of master runners. Journal of Applied Physiology, 66(2), 949-954.