Physiological and biochemical variables asssociated with body fat loss in overweight women

N. L. Keim, T. F. Barbieri, M. Van Loan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During a weight loss study conducted on a metabolic unit, five women lost an average of 8.7 ± 0.7 kg of body fat mass (FM) with a 12 week treatment of low energy diet plus exercise. Another group of five women lost 4.4 ± 0.7 kg FM with a 12 week treatment of an adequate diet plus exercise. Within each treatment, the amount of FM lost varied by approximately 2-fold. To explain the variability in FM loss, we tested its association by multiple regression analysis with several physiological and biochemical measurements obtained during a 2 week stabilization period or early in the treatment period. The variable most closely correlated with FM loss was plasma free fatty acid levels following exercise (EX-FFA). This variable alone accounted for 79 percent of the variation in FM loss. EX-FFA was simple to measure and was repeatedly correlated with FM loss, whether FFA values of the first exercise test or EX-FFA values obtained later in the experimental period were used. Of the physiological variables tested, the rate of fat calories expended in response to a test meal was correlated with FM loss and accounted for 71 percent of the variation. Upon subsequent testing, however, this relationship was not repeatable. When a treatment group designation (dummy-coded variable) was added to the regression analysis, the rate of fat calories expended at rest (FAT(RMR)) was related to FM loss. Together, FAT(RMR) and the dummy-coded variable accounted for 87 percent of the variation in FM loss. In a separate multiple regression equation, the combination of EX-FFA and the dummy-coded variable also accounted for 87 percent of the variation in FM loss. Further evaluation of these relationships is required to determine if EX-FFA or FAT(RMR) would be useful as predictors of FM loss under conditions of weight loss where individuals are living freely in the community and consuming a variety of diets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-293
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

body fat
Adipose Tissue
Fats
lipids
exercise
Exercise
Diet
Weight Loss
regression analysis
weight loss
Regression Analysis
Therapeutics
low calorie diet
exercise test
test meals
Exercise Test
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
diet
Meals
free fatty acids

Keywords

  • Fat utilization
  • Free fatty acids
  • Lipolysis
  • Resting metabolic rate
  • Weight reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Physiological and biochemical variables asssociated with body fat loss in overweight women. / Keim, N. L.; Barbieri, T. F.; Van Loan, M.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1991, p. 283-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keim, N. L. ; Barbieri, T. F. ; Van Loan, M. / Physiological and biochemical variables asssociated with body fat loss in overweight women. In: International Journal of Obesity. 1991 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 283-293.
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