Physicians' attitudes toward managed care: Assessment and potential effects on practice behaviors

Robert A Bell, Richard L Kravitz, Allan D. Siefkin, Garrett E. Foulke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to identify the key components of physicians' attitudes toward managed care and develop a tool to assess these components. We developed a questionnaire based on physicians' reactions to managed care, as reflected in the published literature. We mailed this questionnaire to a sample of 753 community physicians in the greater Sacramento area. A factor analysis of these data (n=315) identified five unifactorial scales, which we labeled managed care quality, need to adapt to managed care, cost-containment effectiveness of managed care, personal knowledge of managed care, and inevitability of managed care. Physicians were most negative about the quality of managed care and most in agreement about the need to adapt to it. Correlations among these five scales, while statistically significant, were modest in size, suggesting that these physicians were quite discriminating in their evaluations. In comparison with medical/surgical specialists, primary care physicians rated the quality of managed care, their knowledge of it, and the inevitability of a national transition to managed care more positively. These measures predicted the physicians' intentions to alter their medical behaviors to comply with managed care practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1297-1304
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume3
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1997

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Managed Care Programs
managed care
physician
Physicians
Quality of Health Care
medical specialist
cost containment
Cost Control
questionnaire
Primary Care Physicians
Statistical Factor Analysis
Cost-Benefit Analysis
factor analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Physicians' attitudes toward managed care : Assessment and potential effects on practice behaviors. / Bell, Robert A; Kravitz, Richard L; Siefkin, Allan D.; Foulke, Garrett E.

In: American Journal of Managed Care, Vol. 3, No. 9, 09.1997, p. 1297-1304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bell, Robert A ; Kravitz, Richard L ; Siefkin, Allan D. ; Foulke, Garrett E. / Physicians' attitudes toward managed care : Assessment and potential effects on practice behaviors. In: American Journal of Managed Care. 1997 ; Vol. 3, No. 9. pp. 1297-1304.
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