Physician job satisfaction as a public health issue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Hirschman's classic formulation, physicians can signal discontent with their conditions of work by "exiting" (leaving the profession or not entering it in the first place) or by giving "voice" to their concerns (e.g. complaining, protesting, bargaining collectively, or conducting work actions and strikes). This Commentary reviews the findings of a survey of Israeli neonatologists by Moshe et al. Survey respondents were satisfied with their careers but not with salary, patient care demands, and leisure time, a pattern that has been seen in other countries, particularly within "small, acute care specialties" (SACS). One question for policymakers is how to help physicians in SACS maintain work-life balance and avoid burnout while providing superb patient care. The Commentary considers several possible solutions while advocating for rigorous and comprehensive monitoring of physician satisfaction over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number51
JournalIsrael Journal of Health Policy Research
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 14 2012

Fingerprint

Job Satisfaction
Public Health
Physicians
Patient Care
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Leisure Activities
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Physician job satisfaction as a public health issue. / Kravitz, Richard L.

In: Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, Vol. 1, No. 1, 51, 14.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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