Physician intervention and Chinese americans’ colorectal cancer screening

Judy Huei Yu Wang, Grace X. Ma, Wenchi Liang, Yin Tan, Kepher H. Makambi, Roucheng Dong, Sally W. Vernon, Shin-Ping Tu, Jeanne S. Mandelblatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We conducted a cluster-randomized trial evaluating an intervention that trained Chinese-American primary care physicians to increase their Chinese patients’ colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Methods: Twenty-five physicians (13 randomized to the intervention arm and 12 to the control arm) and 479 of their patients (aged 50-75 and nonadherent to CRC screening guidelines) were enrolled. The intervention, guided by Social Cognitive Theory, included a communication guide and 2 in-office training sessions to enhance physicians’ efficacy in communicating CRC screening with patients. Patients’ CRC screening rates (trial outcome) and rating of physician communication before intervention and at 12-month follow-up were assessed. Intention-to-treat analysis for outcome evaluation was conducted. Results: Screening rates were slightly higher in the intervention vs. the control arm (24.4% vs. 17.7%, p = .24). In post hoc analyses, intervention arm patients who perceived better communication were more likely to be screened than those who did not (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.15). This relationship was not seen in the control arm. Conclusions: This physician-focused intervention had small, non-significant effects in increasing Chinese patients’ CRC screening rates. Physician communication appeared to explain intervention efficacy. More intensive interventions are needed to enhance Chinese patients’ CRC screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-26
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
cancer
physician
Physicians
Communication
arms control
communication
Intention to Treat Analysis
Primary Care Physicians
cognitive theory
Guidelines
rating

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer screening
  • Physician-focused intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Wang, J. H. Y., Ma, G. X., Liang, W., Tan, Y., Makambi, K. H., Dong, R., ... Mandelblatt, J. S. (2018). Physician intervention and Chinese americans’ colorectal cancer screening. American Journal of Health Behavior, 42(1), 13-26. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.42.1.2

Physician intervention and Chinese americans’ colorectal cancer screening. / Wang, Judy Huei Yu; Ma, Grace X.; Liang, Wenchi; Tan, Yin; Makambi, Kepher H.; Dong, Roucheng; Vernon, Sally W.; Tu, Shin-Ping; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 13-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, JHY, Ma, GX, Liang, W, Tan, Y, Makambi, KH, Dong, R, Vernon, SW, Tu, S-P & Mandelblatt, JS 2018, 'Physician intervention and Chinese americans’ colorectal cancer screening', American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 13-26. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.42.1.2
Wang, Judy Huei Yu ; Ma, Grace X. ; Liang, Wenchi ; Tan, Yin ; Makambi, Kepher H. ; Dong, Roucheng ; Vernon, Sally W. ; Tu, Shin-Ping ; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S. / Physician intervention and Chinese americans’ colorectal cancer screening. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 13-26.
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