Physical impairment and body weight history in postmenopausal women: the Women’s Health Initiative

Amal A. Wanigatunga, Sandrine S. Sourdet, Michael J. LaMonte, Molly E. Waring, Rami Nassir, Lorena Garcia, Jennifer W. Bea, Rebecca A. Seguin, Judith K. Ockene, Gloria E. Sarto, Marcia L. Stefanick, Marian Limacher, Todd M. Manini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether weight history and weight transitions over adult lifespan contribute to physical impairment among postmenopausal women. Design: BMI categories were calculated among postmenopausal women who reported their weight and height at age 18 years. Multiple-variable logistic regression was used to determine the association between BMI at age 18 years and BMI transitions over adulthood on severe physical impairment (SPI), defined as scoring <60 on the Physical Functioning subscale of the Rand thirty-six-item Short-Form Health Survey. Setting: Participants were part of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI OS), where participants’ health was followed over time via questionnaires and clinical assessments. Subjects: Postmenopausal women (n 76 016; mean age 63·5 (sd 7·3) years). Results: Women with overweight (BMI=25·0–29·9 kg/m2) or obesity (BMI≥30·0 kg/m2) at 18 years had greater odds (OR (95 % CI)) of SPI (1·51 (1·35, 1·69) and 2·14 (1·72, 2·65), respectively) than normal-weight (BMI=18·5–24·9 kg/m2) counterparts. Transitions from normal weight to overweight/obese or to underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) were associated with greater odds of SPI (1·97 (1·84, 2·11) and 1·35 (1·06, 1·71), respectively) compared with weight stability. Shifting from underweight to overweight/obese also had increased odds of SPI (1·52 (1·11, 2·09)). Overweight/obese to normal BMI transitions resulted in a reduced SPI odds (0·52 (0·39, 0·71)). Conclusions: Higher weight history and transitions into higher weight classes were associated with higher likelihood of SPI, while transitioning into lower weight classes for those with overweight/obesity was protective among postmenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 8 2016

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Body Weight
Weights and Measures
Thinness
Obesity
History
Health Surveys
Observational Studies
Logistic Models
Health

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Body weight
  • Disability
  • Physical function
  • Physical impairment
  • Weight change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Wanigatunga, A. A., Sourdet, S. S., LaMonte, M. J., Waring, M. E., Nassir, R., Garcia, L., ... Manini, T. M. (Accepted/In press). Physical impairment and body weight history in postmenopausal women: the Women’s Health Initiative. Public Health Nutrition, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980016001415

Physical impairment and body weight history in postmenopausal women : the Women’s Health Initiative. / Wanigatunga, Amal A.; Sourdet, Sandrine S.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Waring, Molly E.; Nassir, Rami; Garcia, Lorena; Bea, Jennifer W.; Seguin, Rebecca A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sarto, Gloria E.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Limacher, Marian; Manini, Todd M.

In: Public Health Nutrition, 08.06.2016, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wanigatunga, AA, Sourdet, SS, LaMonte, MJ, Waring, ME, Nassir, R, Garcia, L, Bea, JW, Seguin, RA, Ockene, JK, Sarto, GE, Stefanick, ML, Limacher, M & Manini, TM 2016, 'Physical impairment and body weight history in postmenopausal women: the Women’s Health Initiative', Public Health Nutrition, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980016001415
Wanigatunga, Amal A. ; Sourdet, Sandrine S. ; LaMonte, Michael J. ; Waring, Molly E. ; Nassir, Rami ; Garcia, Lorena ; Bea, Jennifer W. ; Seguin, Rebecca A. ; Ockene, Judith K. ; Sarto, Gloria E. ; Stefanick, Marcia L. ; Limacher, Marian ; Manini, Todd M. / Physical impairment and body weight history in postmenopausal women : the Women’s Health Initiative. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2016 ; pp. 1-9.
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abstract = "Objective: To examine whether weight history and weight transitions over adult lifespan contribute to physical impairment among postmenopausal women. Design: BMI categories were calculated among postmenopausal women who reported their weight and height at age 18 years. Multiple-variable logistic regression was used to determine the association between BMI at age 18 years and BMI transitions over adulthood on severe physical impairment (SPI), defined as scoring <60 on the Physical Functioning subscale of the Rand thirty-six-item Short-Form Health Survey. Setting: Participants were part of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI OS), where participants’ health was followed over time via questionnaires and clinical assessments. Subjects: Postmenopausal women (n 76 016; mean age 63·5 (sd 7·3) years). Results: Women with overweight (BMI=25·0–29·9 kg/m2) or obesity (BMI≥30·0 kg/m2) at 18 years had greater odds (OR (95 {\%} CI)) of SPI (1·51 (1·35, 1·69) and 2·14 (1·72, 2·65), respectively) than normal-weight (BMI=18·5–24·9 kg/m2) counterparts. Transitions from normal weight to overweight/obese or to underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) were associated with greater odds of SPI (1·97 (1·84, 2·11) and 1·35 (1·06, 1·71), respectively) compared with weight stability. Shifting from underweight to overweight/obese also had increased odds of SPI (1·52 (1·11, 2·09)). Overweight/obese to normal BMI transitions resulted in a reduced SPI odds (0·52 (0·39, 0·71)). Conclusions: Higher weight history and transitions into higher weight classes were associated with higher likelihood of SPI, while transitioning into lower weight classes for those with overweight/obesity was protective among postmenopausal women.",
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AU - Waring, Molly E.

AU - Nassir, Rami

AU - Garcia, Lorena

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AU - Seguin, Rebecca A.

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