Physical fitness and C-reactive protein level in children and young adults: The Columbia University BioMarkers Study

Carmen R. Isasi, Richard J. Deckelbaum, Russell P. Tracy, Thomas J. Starc, Lars Berglund, Steven Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To examine the association of physical fitness with C-reactive protein (CRP) level in children and young adults. Methods. Subjects (N = 205) aged 6 to 24 years were enrolled in the Columbia University BioMarkers Study (1994-1998). Physical fitness was assessed using a non-effort-dependent treadmill testing protocol (physical work capacity at heart rate of 170 beats per minute). CRP level was measured using a high-sensitivity assay. Results. Subjects were 54% female and 65% of Hispanic origin. Mean fitness level was higher in boys than in girls, but CRP levels did not differ by gender. Fitness level was inversely correlated with CRP (r = -0.22). This relationship was significant in boys (r = -0.32) but not in girls (r = -0.15). After multivariate regression adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and family history of early-onset ischemic heart disease, physical fitness remained inversely associated with CRP level in boys (β = -0.02; standard error = 0.01). Conclusions. These findings indicate that physical fitness is inversely related to CRP level in children and that this relationship is more pronounced in boys than in girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-338
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics
Volume111
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

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Physical Fitness
C-Reactive Protein
Young Adult
Biomarkers
Hispanic Americans
Myocardial Ischemia
Body Mass Index
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Children
  • Fitness
  • Obesity
  • Physical fitness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Physical fitness and C-reactive protein level in children and young adults : The Columbia University BioMarkers Study. / Isasi, Carmen R.; Deckelbaum, Richard J.; Tracy, Russell P.; Starc, Thomas J.; Berglund, Lars; Shea, Steven.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 111, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 332-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Isasi, Carmen R. ; Deckelbaum, Richard J. ; Tracy, Russell P. ; Starc, Thomas J. ; Berglund, Lars ; Shea, Steven. / Physical fitness and C-reactive protein level in children and young adults : The Columbia University BioMarkers Study. In: Pediatrics. 2003 ; Vol. 111, No. 2. pp. 332-338.
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