Physical assignments of human chromosome 13 genes on pig chromosome 11 demonstrate extensive synteny and gene order conservation between pig and human

H. S. Sun, M. Yerle, P. Pinton, P. Chardon, C. Rogel-Gaillard, Leslie A Lyons, T. F. Laughlin, C. K. Tuggle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous mapping between the human and pig genomes suggested extensive conservation of human chromosome 13 (HSA13) to pig chromosome 11 (SSC11). The objectives of this study were comparative gene mapping of pig homologs of HSA13 genes and examining gene order within this conserved synteny group by physical assignment of each locus. A detailed HSA13 to SSC11 comparison was chosen since the comparative gene map is not well developed for these chromosomes and a rearranged gene order within conserved synteny groups was observed from the comparison between HSA13 and bovine chromosome 12 (BTA12). Heterologous primers for PCR were designed and used to amplify pig homologous fragments. The pig fragments were sequenced to confirm the homology. Six pig STSs (FLT1, ESD, RB1, HTR2A, EDNRB, and F10) were physically mapped using a somatic cell hybrid panel to SSC11, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping was also applied to improve map resolution and determine gene order. Results from this study increase the comparative information available on SSC11 and suggest a conserved gene order on SSC11 and HSA13, in contrast to human:bovine comparisons of this syntenic group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-308
Number of pages5
JournalAnimal Genetics
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Comparative map
  • Physical mapping
  • Pig
  • SSC11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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