Phylogenetic Analysis and Gene Functional Predictions: Phylogenomics in Action

Jonathan A Eisen, Martin Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Making accurate functional predictions for genes is a key step in this era of high throughput gene and genome sequencing. While most functional prediction methods are comparative in nature, many do not take advantage of the power that an evolutionary perspective provides to any comparative biology analysis. Here we review how evolutionary analysis can greatly benefit both homology-based and non-homology-based functional prediction methods. Examples that are discussed include phylogenetic determination of orthology, the use of character state reconstruction analysis of gene function, and evolutionary analysis of rates and patterns of gene evolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)481-487
Number of pages7
JournalTheoretical Population Biology
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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phylogenetics
prediction
gene
phylogeny
Genes
genes
homology
genome
Genome
Biological Sciences
analysis
methodology
method
rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Phylogenetic Analysis and Gene Functional Predictions : Phylogenomics in Action. / Eisen, Jonathan A; Wu, Martin.

In: Theoretical Population Biology, Vol. 61, No. 4, 01.06.2002, p. 481-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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