Photodynamic Synovectomy Using Benzoporphyrin Derivative in an Antigen-induced Arthritis Model for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Kenneth B. Trauner, Regina F Gandour-Edwards, Mike Bamberg, Sonya Shortkroff, Clement Sledge, Tayyaba Hasan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Experimental photodynamic therapy (PDT) has recently been adapted for the treatment of inflammatory and rheumatoid arthritis. The biodistribution of benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA) and the effect of percutaneous light activation via intra-articular bare cleaved optical fibers was investigated using a rabbit-antigen-induced arthritis model. Qualitative evaluation of intra-articular photosensitizer clearance was performed with laser-induced fluorescence from 0 to 6 h following intravenous injection. The compound was rapidly taken up within the joint and then cleared steadily over the 6 h interval. Biodistribution was determined by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluoroscopic extraction techniques 3 h following intravenous injection of 2 mg/kg BPD-MA. The biodistribution study demonstrated elevated levels of BPD-MA in synovium (0.35 μg/g) and muscle (0.35μg/g). Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated presence of the compound within pathologic synovium but absence of the photosensitizer within meniscus, ligament, bone and articular cartilage. Tissue effects were evaluated histologically at 2 and 4 weeks posttreatment. BPD-MA-mediated PDT caused synovial necrosis in the region of light activation in 50% of treatment knees at 2 weeks and 43% at 4 weeks. No damage to nonpathologic tissues was observed. These studies indicate that selective destruction of synovium can be achieved by the light-activated photosensitizing agent BPD-MA without damage to articular cartilage or periarticular soft tissues. PDT needs to be further evaluated to optimize treatment parameters to provide for a new minimally invasive synovectomy technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
Volume67
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1998

Fingerprint

arthritis
antigens
Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Photodynamic therapy
Photosensitizing Agents
Synovial Membrane
Derivatives
Photochemotherapy
Antigens
rings
therapy
cartilage
Joints
Fluorescence microscopy
Cartilage
Articular Cartilage
Tissue
Fluorescence Microscopy
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Photodynamic Synovectomy Using Benzoporphyrin Derivative in an Antigen-induced Arthritis Model for Rheumatoid Arthritis. / Trauner, Kenneth B.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F; Bamberg, Mike; Shortkroff, Sonya; Sledge, Clement; Hasan, Tayyaba.

In: Photochemistry and Photobiology, Vol. 67, No. 1, 01.1998, p. 133-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trauner, Kenneth B. ; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F ; Bamberg, Mike ; Shortkroff, Sonya ; Sledge, Clement ; Hasan, Tayyaba. / Photodynamic Synovectomy Using Benzoporphyrin Derivative in an Antigen-induced Arthritis Model for Rheumatoid Arthritis. In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 1998 ; Vol. 67, No. 1. pp. 133-139.
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