Phenotypic variation among Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae) populations from the Sacramento Valley, California: Horizontal and vertical transmission of West Nile virus, diapause potential, autogeny, and host selection

Brittany M. Nelms, Linda Kothera, Tara Thiemann, Paula A. Macedo, Harry M. Savage, William Reisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The vector competence and bionomics of Culex pipiens form pipiens L. and Cx. pipiens f. molestus Forskäl were evaluated for populations from the Sacramento Valley. Both f. pipiens and f. molestus females became infected, produced disseminated infections, and were able to transmit West Nile virus. Form molestus females also transmitted West Nile virus vertically to egg rafts and F1 progeny, whereas f. pipiens females only transmitted to egg rafts. Culex pipiens complex from urban Sacramento blood-fed on seven different avian species and two mammalian species. Structure analysis of blood-fed mosquitoes identified K = 4 genetic clusters: f. molestus, f. pipiens, a group of genetically similar hybrids (Cluster X), and admixed individuals. When females were exposed as larvae to midwinter conditions in bioenvironmental chambers, 85% (N = 79) of aboveground Cx. pipiens complex females and 100% (N = 34) of underground f. molestus females did not enter reproductive diapause.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1168-1178
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume89
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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