Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and metabolism of acepromazine following intravenous, oral, and sublingual administration to exercised Thoroughbred horses

Heather K Knych, K. Seminoff, D. S. McKemie, Philip H Kass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Acepromazine is a tranquilizer used commonly in equine medicine. This study describes serum and urine concentrations and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of acepromazine following intravenous, oral, and sublingual (SL) administration. Fifteen exercised adult Thoroughbred horses received a single intravenous, oral, and SL dose of 0.09 mg/kg of acepromazine. Blood and urine samples were collected at time 0 and at various times for up to 72 hr and analyzed for acepromazine and its two major metabolites (2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide) using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Acepromazine was also incubated in vitro with whole equine blood and serum concentrations of the parent drug and metabolites determined. Acepromazine was quantitated for 24 hr following intravenous administration and 72 hr following oral and SL administration. Results of in vitro incubations with whole blood suggest additional metabolism by RBCs. The mean ± SEM elimination half-life was 5.16 ± 0.450, 8.58 ± 2.23, and 6.70 ± 2.62 hr following intravenous, oral, and SL administration, respectively. No adverse effects were noted and horses appeared sedate as noted by a decrease in chin-to-ground distance within 5 (i.v.) or 15 (p.o. and SL) minutes postadministration. The duration of sedation lasted 2 hr. Changes in heart rate were minimal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)522-535
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • veterinary(all)

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