Pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin in plasma and milk samples after a single subcutaneous injection in lactating goats (Capra hircus)

B. Grismer, Joan D Rowe, J. Carlson, S. E. Wetzlich, Lisa A Tell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eight adult female dairy goats received one subcutaneous administration of tulathromycin at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. Blood and milk samples were assayed for tulathromycin and the common fragment of tulathromycin, respectively, using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic disposition of tulathromycin was analyzed by a noncompartmental approach. Mean plasma pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following single-dose administration of tulathromycin were as follows: Cmax (121.54 ± 19.01 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-24 h); area under the curve AUC0→∞ (8324.54 ± 1706.56 ng·h/mL); terminal-phase rate constant λz (0.01 ± 0.002 h-1); and terminal-phase rate constant half-life t1/2λz (67.20 h; harmonic). Mean milk pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following 45 days of sampling were as follows: Cmax (1594 ± 379.23 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-36 h); AUC0→∞ (72,250.51 ± 18,909.57 ng·h/mL); λz (0.005 ± 0.001 h-1); and t1/2λz (155.28 h; harmonic). All goats had injection-site reactions that diminished in size over time. The conclusions from this study were that tulathromycin residues are detectable in milk samples from adult goats for at least 45 days following subcutaneous administration, this therapeutic option should be reserved for cases where other treatment options have failed, and goat milk should be withheld from the human food chain for at least 45 days following tulathromycin administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-208
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

subcutaneous injection
Subcutaneous Injections
Goats
pharmacokinetics
Milk
Pharmacokinetics
goats
milk
human food chain
dairy goats
injection site
goat milk
dosage
sampling
liquid chromatography
half life
mass spectrometry
therapeutics
body weight
blood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{3e08c671206347a38bc85126f6854d2c,
title = "Pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin in plasma and milk samples after a single subcutaneous injection in lactating goats (Capra hircus)",
abstract = "Eight adult female dairy goats received one subcutaneous administration of tulathromycin at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. Blood and milk samples were assayed for tulathromycin and the common fragment of tulathromycin, respectively, using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic disposition of tulathromycin was analyzed by a noncompartmental approach. Mean plasma pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following single-dose administration of tulathromycin were as follows: Cmax (121.54 ± 19.01 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-24 h); area under the curve AUC0→∞ (8324.54 ± 1706.56 ng·h/mL); terminal-phase rate constant λz (0.01 ± 0.002 h-1); and terminal-phase rate constant half-life t1/2λz (67.20 h; harmonic). Mean milk pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following 45 days of sampling were as follows: Cmax (1594 ± 379.23 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-36 h); AUC0→∞ (72,250.51 ± 18,909.57 ng·h/mL); λz (0.005 ± 0.001 h-1); and t1/2λz (155.28 h; harmonic). All goats had injection-site reactions that diminished in size over time. The conclusions from this study were that tulathromycin residues are detectable in milk samples from adult goats for at least 45 days following subcutaneous administration, this therapeutic option should be reserved for cases where other treatment options have failed, and goat milk should be withheld from the human food chain for at least 45 days following tulathromycin administration.",
author = "B. Grismer and Rowe, {Joan D} and J. Carlson and Wetzlich, {S. E.} and Tell, {Lisa A}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1111/jvp.12071",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "205--208",
journal = "Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics",
issn = "0140-7783",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin in plasma and milk samples after a single subcutaneous injection in lactating goats (Capra hircus)

AU - Grismer, B.

AU - Rowe, Joan D

AU - Carlson, J.

AU - Wetzlich, S. E.

AU - Tell, Lisa A

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Eight adult female dairy goats received one subcutaneous administration of tulathromycin at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. Blood and milk samples were assayed for tulathromycin and the common fragment of tulathromycin, respectively, using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic disposition of tulathromycin was analyzed by a noncompartmental approach. Mean plasma pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following single-dose administration of tulathromycin were as follows: Cmax (121.54 ± 19.01 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-24 h); area under the curve AUC0→∞ (8324.54 ± 1706.56 ng·h/mL); terminal-phase rate constant λz (0.01 ± 0.002 h-1); and terminal-phase rate constant half-life t1/2λz (67.20 h; harmonic). Mean milk pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following 45 days of sampling were as follows: Cmax (1594 ± 379.23 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-36 h); AUC0→∞ (72,250.51 ± 18,909.57 ng·h/mL); λz (0.005 ± 0.001 h-1); and t1/2λz (155.28 h; harmonic). All goats had injection-site reactions that diminished in size over time. The conclusions from this study were that tulathromycin residues are detectable in milk samples from adult goats for at least 45 days following subcutaneous administration, this therapeutic option should be reserved for cases where other treatment options have failed, and goat milk should be withheld from the human food chain for at least 45 days following tulathromycin administration.

AB - Eight adult female dairy goats received one subcutaneous administration of tulathromycin at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. Blood and milk samples were assayed for tulathromycin and the common fragment of tulathromycin, respectively, using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic disposition of tulathromycin was analyzed by a noncompartmental approach. Mean plasma pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following single-dose administration of tulathromycin were as follows: Cmax (121.54 ± 19.01 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-24 h); area under the curve AUC0→∞ (8324.54 ± 1706.56 ng·h/mL); terminal-phase rate constant λz (0.01 ± 0.002 h-1); and terminal-phase rate constant half-life t1/2λz (67.20 h; harmonic). Mean milk pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following 45 days of sampling were as follows: Cmax (1594 ± 379.23 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-36 h); AUC0→∞ (72,250.51 ± 18,909.57 ng·h/mL); λz (0.005 ± 0.001 h-1); and t1/2λz (155.28 h; harmonic). All goats had injection-site reactions that diminished in size over time. The conclusions from this study were that tulathromycin residues are detectable in milk samples from adult goats for at least 45 days following subcutaneous administration, this therapeutic option should be reserved for cases where other treatment options have failed, and goat milk should be withheld from the human food chain for at least 45 days following tulathromycin administration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84895558118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84895558118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jvp.12071

DO - 10.1111/jvp.12071

M3 - Article

C2 - 23889045

AN - SCOPUS:84895558118

VL - 37

SP - 205

EP - 208

JO - Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

JF - Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

SN - 0140-7783

IS - 2

ER -