Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana)

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. Animals - 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Procedures - Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Results - Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1670-1674
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume67
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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Iguanas
Iguana iguana
Iguana (Iguanidae)
anesthetics
pharmacokinetics
Anesthetics
Pharmacokinetics
isoflurane
blood gases
breathing
solubility
Gases
Isoflurane
Solubility
Inhalation
gases
uptake mechanisms
kinetics
animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana)",
abstract = "Objective - To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. Animals - 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Procedures - Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Results - Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.",
author = "Brosnan, {Robert J} and Pypendop, {Bruno H} and Barter, {Linda S} and Michelle Hawkins",
year = "2006",
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issn = "0002-9645",
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T1 - Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana)

AU - Brosnan, Robert J

AU - Pypendop, Bruno H

AU - Barter, Linda S

AU - Hawkins, Michelle

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Objective - To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. Animals - 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Procedures - Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Results - Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

AB - Objective - To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. Animals - 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Procedures - Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Results - Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

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