Pharmacokinetics and tissue elimination of tulathromycin following subcutaneous administration in meat goats

Jessica Romanet, Geof W. Smith, Teresa L. Leavens, Ronald E. Baynes, Scott E. Wetzlich, Jim E. Riviere, Lisa A Tell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To determine the tissue depletion profile of tulathromycin and determine an appropriate slaughter withdrawal interval in meat goats after multiple SC injections of the drug. Animals-16 healthy Boer goats. Procedures-All goats were administered tulathromycin (2.5 mg/kg, SC) twice, with a 7-day interval between doses. Blood samples were collected throughout the study, and goats were euthanized at 2, 5, 10, and 20 days after the second tulathromycin dose. Lung, liver, kidney, fat, and muscle tissues were collected. Concentrations of tulathromycin in plasma and the hydrolytic tulathromycin fragment CP-60,300 in tissue samples were determined with ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results-The plasma profile of tulathromycin was biphasic. Absorption was very rapid, with maximum drug concentrations (1.00 ± 0.42 μg/mL and 2.09 ± 1.77 μg/mL following the first and second doses, respectively) detected within approximately 1 hour after injection. Plasma terminal elimination half-life of tulathromycin was 61.4 ± 14.1 hours after the second dose. Halflives in tissue ranged from 2.4 days for muscle to 9.0 days for lung tissue; kidney tissue was used to determine the withdrawal interval for tulathromycin in goats because it is considered an edible tissue. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-On the basis of the tissue tolerance limit in cattle of 5 ppm (μg/g), the calculated withdrawal interval for tulathromycin would be 19 days following SC administration in goats. On the basis of the more stringent guidelines recommended by the FDA, the calculated meat withdrawal interval following tulathromycin administration in goats was 34 days.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1634-1640
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume73
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

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goat meat
subcutaneous injection
Goats
Meat
pharmacokinetics
Pharmacokinetics
goats
dosage
Boer (goat breed)
lungs
kidneys
drug injection
tissues
tulathromycin
muscle tissues
Kidney
liquid chromatography
half life
Muscles
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Pharmacokinetics and tissue elimination of tulathromycin following subcutaneous administration in meat goats. / Romanet, Jessica; Smith, Geof W.; Leavens, Teresa L.; Baynes, Ronald E.; Wetzlich, Scott E.; Riviere, Jim E.; Tell, Lisa A.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 73, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 1634-1640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Romanet, Jessica ; Smith, Geof W. ; Leavens, Teresa L. ; Baynes, Ronald E. ; Wetzlich, Scott E. ; Riviere, Jim E. ; Tell, Lisa A. / Pharmacokinetics and tissue elimination of tulathromycin following subcutaneous administration in meat goats. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2012 ; Vol. 73, No. 10. pp. 1634-1640.
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abstract = "Objective-To determine the tissue depletion profile of tulathromycin and determine an appropriate slaughter withdrawal interval in meat goats after multiple SC injections of the drug. Animals-16 healthy Boer goats. Procedures-All goats were administered tulathromycin (2.5 mg/kg, SC) twice, with a 7-day interval between doses. Blood samples were collected throughout the study, and goats were euthanized at 2, 5, 10, and 20 days after the second tulathromycin dose. Lung, liver, kidney, fat, and muscle tissues were collected. Concentrations of tulathromycin in plasma and the hydrolytic tulathromycin fragment CP-60,300 in tissue samples were determined with ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results-The plasma profile of tulathromycin was biphasic. Absorption was very rapid, with maximum drug concentrations (1.00 ± 0.42 μg/mL and 2.09 ± 1.77 μg/mL following the first and second doses, respectively) detected within approximately 1 hour after injection. Plasma terminal elimination half-life of tulathromycin was 61.4 ± 14.1 hours after the second dose. Halflives in tissue ranged from 2.4 days for muscle to 9.0 days for lung tissue; kidney tissue was used to determine the withdrawal interval for tulathromycin in goats because it is considered an edible tissue. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-On the basis of the tissue tolerance limit in cattle of 5 ppm (μg/g), the calculated withdrawal interval for tulathromycin would be 19 days following SC administration in goats. On the basis of the more stringent guidelines recommended by the FDA, the calculated meat withdrawal interval following tulathromycin administration in goats was 34 days.",
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