Pharmacokinetics and selected pharmacodynamics of romifidine following low-dose intravenous administration in combination with exercise to quarter horses

Heather K Knych, Scott D Stanley, D. S. McKemie, S. J. Steinmetz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Romifidine is an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist used for sedation and analgesia in horses. As it is a prohibited substance, its purported use at low doses in performance horses necessitates further study. The primary goal of the study reported here was to describe the serum concentrations and pharmacokinetics of romifidine following low-dose administration immediately prior to exercise, utilizing a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry assay that is currently employed in many drug testing laboratories. An additional objective was to describe changes in heart rate and rhythm following intravenous administration of romifidine followed by exercise. Eight adult Quarter Horses received a single intravenous dose of 5 mg (0.01 mg/kg) romifidine followed by 1 h of exercise. Blood samples were collected and drug concentrations measured at time 0 and at various times up to 72 h. Mean ± SD systemic clearance, steady-state volume of distribution and terminal elimination half-life were 34.1 ± 6.06 mL/min/kg and 4.89 ± 1.31 L/kg and 3.09 ± 1.18 h, respectively. Romifidine serum concentrations fell below the LOQ (0.01 ng/mL) and the LOD (0.005 ng/mL) by 24 h postadministration. Heart rate and rhythm appeared unaffected when a low dose of romifidine was administered immediately prior to exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-574
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)
  • Pharmacology

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