Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pergolide mesylate following long-term administration to horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction

D. Mcfarlane, H. Banse, Heather K Knych, L. K. Maxwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to gain an understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pergolide in horses with PPID after of long-term oral administration. Six horses with confirmed PPID were treated with pergolide (Prascend®) at 1 mg/horse po q24 h for 2 months, followed by 2 mg/horse po q24 h for 4 months. Following the last dose, plasma samples were collected for measurement of pergolide using an LC/MS/MS method and ACTH measurement using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. Noncompartmental and compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed, as well as pharmacodynamic assessment of the effect of plasma pergolide concentrations on plasma ACTH concentrations. Pergolide effectively decreased plasma ACTH concentration in aged horses with PPID, with similar pharmacokinetic properties as reported in young horses, including an approximate terminal half-life of 24 h. Plasma ACTH concentration increased by 50% in 3/6 horses at 2 days and 6/6 horses 10 days after discontinuing drug administration. Pergolide was quantified in all horses at 2 days and in none at 10 days after last dose. In summary, after discontinuing pergolide treatment, plasma ACTH concentration increased while pergolide was still quantifiable in some horses. Once-daily dosing of pergolide is likely appropriate in most horses with PPID for regulating the plasma ACTH concentration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • veterinary(all)

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