Phage anti-immunocomplex assay for clomazone

Two-site recognition increasing assay specificity and facilitating adaptation into an on-site format

M. A. Rossotti, M. Carlomagno, A. González-Techera, B. D. Hammock, Jerold A Last, G. González-Sapienza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of the use of herbicides in agriculture can be minimized by compliance with good management practices that reduce the amount used and their release into the environment. Simple tests that provide real time on-site information about these chemicals are a major aid for these programs. In this work, we show that phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA), a method that uses phage-borne peptides to detect the formation of antibody-analyte immunocomplexes, is an advantageous technology to produce such field tests. A monoclonal antibody to the herbicide clomazone was raised and used in the development of conventional competitive and noncompetitive PHAIA immunoassays. The sensitivity attained with the PHAIA format was over 10 times higher than that of the competitive format. The cross-reactivity of the two methods was also compared using structurally related compounds, and we observed that the two-site binding of PHAIA "double-checks" the recognition of the analyte, thereby increasing the assay specificity. The positive readout of the noncompetitive PHAIA method allowed adaptation of the assay into a rapid and simple format where as little as 0.4 ng/mL clomazone (more than 10-fold lower than the proposed standard) in water samples from a rice field could be easily detected by simple visual inspection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8838-8843
Number of pages6
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume82
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Bacteriophages
Assays
Herbicides
clomazone
Agriculture
Inspection
Binding Sites
Monoclonal Antibodies
Peptides
Water
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Phage anti-immunocomplex assay for clomazone : Two-site recognition increasing assay specificity and facilitating adaptation into an on-site format. / Rossotti, M. A.; Carlomagno, M.; González-Techera, A.; Hammock, B. D.; Last, Jerold A; González-Sapienza, G.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 82, No. 21, 01.11.2010, p. 8838-8843.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossotti, M. A. ; Carlomagno, M. ; González-Techera, A. ; Hammock, B. D. ; Last, Jerold A ; González-Sapienza, G. / Phage anti-immunocomplex assay for clomazone : Two-site recognition increasing assay specificity and facilitating adaptation into an on-site format. In: Analytical Chemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 82, No. 21. pp. 8838-8843.
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