Personality and EQ-5D scores among individuals with chronic conditions

Anthony F Jerant, Benjamin P. Chapman, Peter Franks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Personality is associated with self-rated health, but prior studies have not examined associations with preference-based measures. We hypothesized similar associations would exist with preference-based health. Methods: We analyzed baseline data from chronically ill individuals enrolled in a self-management intervention. We conducted regression analyses with the EQ-5D summary index score and dimension scores (mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, anxiety/depression) as dependent variables, The key independent variables were NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) personality factors (Neuroticism, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness), adjusting for age, gender, educational level, minority status, and chronic conditions. Results: Of 415 participants, 245 (59%) had ≥2 chronic conditions, 384 (94%) completed the NEO-FFI and 397 (96%) the EQ-5D. After adjustment, Neuroticism was associated with EQ-5D summary index scores [-0.04 per 1 SD increase in Neuroticism (95% CI -0.06, -0.01)]. Neuroticism [AOR 2.99 (95% CI 2.06, 4.35; P < 0.001)] and Openness [1.32 (95% CI 1.00, 1.75; P = 0.05)] were associated with worse anxiety/depression scores, while Conscientiousness was associated with better usual activities scores [0.66 (95% CI 0.49, 0.89; P = 0.01)]. Conclusions: The associations between personality factors and self-rated health appear to extend to preference-based measures. Future studies should explore whether personality affects preference-based health estimates in cost-effectiveness analyses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1195-1204
Number of pages10
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Personality
Health
Self Care
Anxiety
Depression
Social Adjustment
Personality Inventory
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Chronic Disease
Regression Analysis
Pain
Equipment and Supplies
Neuroticism

Keywords

  • Bias
  • Chronic disease
  • Health status
  • Personality
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Personality and EQ-5D scores among individuals with chronic conditions. / Jerant, Anthony F; Chapman, Benjamin P.; Franks, Peter.

In: Quality of Life Research, Vol. 17, No. 9, 11.2008, p. 1195-1204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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