Persistent effects of early infant diet and associated microbiota on the juvenile immune system

Nicole R. Narayan, Gema Méndez-Lagares, Amir Ardeshir, Ding Lu, Koen K A van Rompay, Dennis Hartigan-O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Early infant diet has significant impacts on the gut microbiota and developing immune system. We previously showed that breast-fed and formula-fed rhesus macaques develop significantly different gut microbial communities, which in turn are associated with different immune systems in infancy. Breast-fed animals manifested greater T cell activation and proliferation and harbored robust pools of T helper 17 (TH17) cells. These differences were sustained throughout the first year of life. Here we examine groups of juvenile macaques (approximately 3 to 5 y old), which were breast-fed or formula-fed in infancy. We demonstrate that juveniles breast-fed in infancy maintain immunologic differences into the fifth year of life, principally in CD8+ memory T cell activation. Additionally, long-term correlation networks show that breast-fed animals maintain persistent relationships between immune subsets that are not seen in formula-fed animals. These findings demonstrate that infant feeding practices have continued influence on immunity for up to 3 to 5 y after birth and also reveal mechanisms for microbial modulation of the immune system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-289
Number of pages6
JournalGut Microbes
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Immune System
Breast
Diet
T-Lymphocytes
Th17 Cells
Macaca
Macaca mulatta
Immunity
Cell Proliferation
Parturition

Keywords

  • Breast-milk
  • Gut microbiota
  • Rhesus macaque
  • T cell activation
  • T17 cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Persistent effects of early infant diet and associated microbiota on the juvenile immune system. / Narayan, Nicole R.; Méndez-Lagares, Gema; Ardeshir, Amir; Lu, Ding; van Rompay, Koen K A; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis.

In: Gut Microbes, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 284-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Narayan, Nicole R. ; Méndez-Lagares, Gema ; Ardeshir, Amir ; Lu, Ding ; van Rompay, Koen K A ; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis. / Persistent effects of early infant diet and associated microbiota on the juvenile immune system. In: Gut Microbes. 2015 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 284-289.
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