Persistence of supplemented Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis EVC001 in breastfed infants

Steven A. Frese, Andra A. Hutton, Lindsey N. Contreras, Claire A. Shaw, Michelle C. Palumbo, Giorgio Casaburi, Gege Xu, Jasmine C.C. Davis, Carlito B Lebrilla, Bethany M. Henrick, Samara L. Freeman, Daniela Barile, J. Bruce German, David A. Mills, Jennifer T. Smilowitz, Mark Underwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Attempts to alter intestinal dysbiosis via administration of probiotics have consistently shown that colonization with the administered microbes is transient. This study sought to determine whether provision of an initial course of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) would lead to persistent colonization of the probiotic organism in breastfed infants. Mothers intending to breastfeed were recruited and provided with lactation support. One group of mothers fed B. infantis EVC001 to their infants from day 7 to day 28 of life (n = 34), and the second group did not administer any probiotic (n = 32). Fecal samples were collected during the first 60 postnatal days in both groups. Fecal samples were assessed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, quantitative PCR, mass spectrometry, and endotoxin measurement. B. infantis-fed infants had significantly higher populations of fecal Bifidobacteriaceae, in particular B. infantis, while EVC001 was fed, and this difference persisted more than 30 days after EVC001 supplementation ceased. Fecal milk oligosaccharides were significantly lower in B. infantis EVC001-fed infants, demonstrating higher consumption of human milk oligosaccharides by B. infantis EVC001. Concentrations of acetate and lactate were significantly higher and fecal pH was significantly lower in infants fed EVC001, demonstrating alterations in intestinal fermentation. Infants colonized by Bifidobacteriaceae at high levels had 4-fold-lower fecal endotoxin levels, consistent with observed lower levels of Gram-negative Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00501-17
JournalmSphere
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Probiotics
Oligosaccharides
Endotoxins
Dysbiosis
Mothers
Bacteroidetes
Proteobacteria
Human Milk
rRNA Genes
Lactation
Fermentation
Bifidobacterium longum
Lactic Acid
Mass Spectrometry
Milk
Acetates
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Population

Keywords

  • Bifidobacteria
  • Breast milk
  • Human milk oligosaccharides
  • Infant microbiome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Frese, S. A., Hutton, A. A., Contreras, L. N., Shaw, C. A., Palumbo, M. C., Casaburi, G., ... Underwood, M. (2017). Persistence of supplemented Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis EVC001 in breastfed infants. mSphere, 2(6), [e00501-17]. https://doi.org/10.1128/mSphere.00501-17

Persistence of supplemented Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis EVC001 in breastfed infants. / Frese, Steven A.; Hutton, Andra A.; Contreras, Lindsey N.; Shaw, Claire A.; Palumbo, Michelle C.; Casaburi, Giorgio; Xu, Gege; Davis, Jasmine C.C.; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Henrick, Bethany M.; Freeman, Samara L.; Barile, Daniela; German, J. Bruce; Mills, David A.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Underwood, Mark.

In: mSphere, Vol. 2, No. 6, e00501-17, 01.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Frese, SA, Hutton, AA, Contreras, LN, Shaw, CA, Palumbo, MC, Casaburi, G, Xu, G, Davis, JCC, Lebrilla, CB, Henrick, BM, Freeman, SL, Barile, D, German, JB, Mills, DA, Smilowitz, JT & Underwood, M 2017, 'Persistence of supplemented Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis EVC001 in breastfed infants', mSphere, vol. 2, no. 6, e00501-17. https://doi.org/10.1128/mSphere.00501-17
Frese SA, Hutton AA, Contreras LN, Shaw CA, Palumbo MC, Casaburi G et al. Persistence of supplemented Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis EVC001 in breastfed infants. mSphere. 2017 Nov 1;2(6). e00501-17. https://doi.org/10.1128/mSphere.00501-17
Frese, Steven A. ; Hutton, Andra A. ; Contreras, Lindsey N. ; Shaw, Claire A. ; Palumbo, Michelle C. ; Casaburi, Giorgio ; Xu, Gege ; Davis, Jasmine C.C. ; Lebrilla, Carlito B ; Henrick, Bethany M. ; Freeman, Samara L. ; Barile, Daniela ; German, J. Bruce ; Mills, David A. ; Smilowitz, Jennifer T. ; Underwood, Mark. / Persistence of supplemented Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis EVC001 in breastfed infants. In: mSphere. 2017 ; Vol. 2, No. 6.
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AU - Freeman, Samara L.

AU - Barile, Daniela

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AU - Underwood, Mark

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