Permanent hemodialysis vascular access survival in children and adolescents with end-stage renal disease

Rita D. Sheth, Mary L. Brandt, Eileen D. Brewer, Jed G. Nuchtern, Arundhati S Kale, Stuart L. Golostein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Transplantation is the optimal therapy for pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, but in a subset of patients with peritoneal membrane failure, failed transplants or poor social situations, chronic hemodialysis (HD) remains the only option. Long-term survival of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) in pediatric patients has not been well described. Methods. We studied the survival of permanent vascular access in 34 pediatric ESRD patients treated with chronic HD at our institution between 1/1/89 and 12/1/95 and followed to 12/31/2000. Results. Twenty-four AVFs and 28 AVGs were created in 19 and 23 patients, respectively. Mean age and weight at insertion were 15.1 years (range 7.1 to 20.9) and 46 kg (18 to 81) for AVFs and 13.3 years (3.8 to 21.1) and 41.5 kg (10.5 to 145) for AVGs. Fifteen patients weighed <35 kg at the time of access creation (7 AVFs in 5 patients, 14 AVGs in 13 patients). Excluding primary failures, one-year, three-year and five-year patency rates for AVFs (74%, 59%, 59%) and AVGs (96%, 69%, 40%) were not significantly different. Patency did not correlate with patient weight or age at access creation. Primary access failure occurred more often (P < 0.01) in AVFs (8/24) compared to AVGs (1/28). Access thrombosis, stenosis and infection occurred more frequently in AVG (P = 0.02). Conclusions. Both AVF and AVG function well even in small pediatric patients and have survival rates equivalent to adult series and longer than cuffed venous catheters in pediatric patients. Both AVFs and AVGs are preferable for long-term HD access in pediatrics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1864-1869
Number of pages6
JournalKidney International
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chronic Kidney Failure
Blood Vessels
Renal Dialysis
Arteriovenous Fistula
Transplants
Survival
Pediatrics
Weights and Measures
Pathologic Constriction
Thrombosis
Catheters
Survival Rate
Transplantation
Membranes
Infection

Keywords

  • A-V fistula
  • A-V grafts
  • Dialysis vascular access survival
  • End-stage renal disease
  • Graft failure
  • Kidney and children
  • Pediatric hemodialysis
  • Stenosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Permanent hemodialysis vascular access survival in children and adolescents with end-stage renal disease. / Sheth, Rita D.; Brandt, Mary L.; Brewer, Eileen D.; Nuchtern, Jed G.; Kale, Arundhati S; Golostein, Stuart L.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 62, No. 5, 01.01.2002, p. 1864-1869.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheth, Rita D. ; Brandt, Mary L. ; Brewer, Eileen D. ; Nuchtern, Jed G. ; Kale, Arundhati S ; Golostein, Stuart L. / Permanent hemodialysis vascular access survival in children and adolescents with end-stage renal disease. In: Kidney International. 2002 ; Vol. 62, No. 5. pp. 1864-1869.
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AU - Brandt, Mary L.

AU - Brewer, Eileen D.

AU - Nuchtern, Jed G.

AU - Kale, Arundhati S

AU - Golostein, Stuart L.

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N2 - Background. Transplantation is the optimal therapy for pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, but in a subset of patients with peritoneal membrane failure, failed transplants or poor social situations, chronic hemodialysis (HD) remains the only option. Long-term survival of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) in pediatric patients has not been well described. Methods. We studied the survival of permanent vascular access in 34 pediatric ESRD patients treated with chronic HD at our institution between 1/1/89 and 12/1/95 and followed to 12/31/2000. Results. Twenty-four AVFs and 28 AVGs were created in 19 and 23 patients, respectively. Mean age and weight at insertion were 15.1 years (range 7.1 to 20.9) and 46 kg (18 to 81) for AVFs and 13.3 years (3.8 to 21.1) and 41.5 kg (10.5 to 145) for AVGs. Fifteen patients weighed <35 kg at the time of access creation (7 AVFs in 5 patients, 14 AVGs in 13 patients). Excluding primary failures, one-year, three-year and five-year patency rates for AVFs (74%, 59%, 59%) and AVGs (96%, 69%, 40%) were not significantly different. Patency did not correlate with patient weight or age at access creation. Primary access failure occurred more often (P < 0.01) in AVFs (8/24) compared to AVGs (1/28). Access thrombosis, stenosis and infection occurred more frequently in AVG (P = 0.02). Conclusions. Both AVF and AVG function well even in small pediatric patients and have survival rates equivalent to adult series and longer than cuffed venous catheters in pediatric patients. Both AVFs and AVGs are preferable for long-term HD access in pediatrics.

AB - Background. Transplantation is the optimal therapy for pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, but in a subset of patients with peritoneal membrane failure, failed transplants or poor social situations, chronic hemodialysis (HD) remains the only option. Long-term survival of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) in pediatric patients has not been well described. Methods. We studied the survival of permanent vascular access in 34 pediatric ESRD patients treated with chronic HD at our institution between 1/1/89 and 12/1/95 and followed to 12/31/2000. Results. Twenty-four AVFs and 28 AVGs were created in 19 and 23 patients, respectively. Mean age and weight at insertion were 15.1 years (range 7.1 to 20.9) and 46 kg (18 to 81) for AVFs and 13.3 years (3.8 to 21.1) and 41.5 kg (10.5 to 145) for AVGs. Fifteen patients weighed <35 kg at the time of access creation (7 AVFs in 5 patients, 14 AVGs in 13 patients). Excluding primary failures, one-year, three-year and five-year patency rates for AVFs (74%, 59%, 59%) and AVGs (96%, 69%, 40%) were not significantly different. Patency did not correlate with patient weight or age at access creation. Primary access failure occurred more often (P < 0.01) in AVFs (8/24) compared to AVGs (1/28). Access thrombosis, stenosis and infection occurred more frequently in AVG (P = 0.02). Conclusions. Both AVF and AVG function well even in small pediatric patients and have survival rates equivalent to adult series and longer than cuffed venous catheters in pediatric patients. Both AVFs and AVGs are preferable for long-term HD access in pediatrics.

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KW - End-stage renal disease

KW - Graft failure

KW - Kidney and children

KW - Pediatric hemodialysis

KW - Stenosis

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