Percutaneous radiologically guided gastrostomy tubes: Procedural description and biomechanical comparison in a canine model

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Abstract

Objective: To describe the novel placement of percutaneous radiologically guided gastrostomy (PRG) tubes in a canine cadaveric model and to biomechanically compare PRG and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube constructs. Study design: Descriptive and biomechanical experimental study. Animals: Fifteen large breed (>25 kg) canine cadavers. Methods: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes, low-profile PRG tubes, and standard PRG tubes were each placed in five canine cadavers. Body wall and stomach (with attached gastrostomy tube constructs) were harvested and biomechanically tested. Data regarding the maximal load to failure and procedure time were statistically analyzed. Results: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and PRG tube placement was successful in all cadavers with no procedure-related complications. Gastrostomy tube placement time was longer for the PEG group vs the low-profile PRG (P =.005) and standard PRG (P =.037) groups. Peak construct strength was lower for the PEG group vs the low-profile PRG (P =.002) and standard PRG (P =.010) groups. The site of failure varied among groups. Conclusion: Percutaneous radiologically guided gastrostomy tubes were successfully placed in all cases with shorter placement time and greater peak construct strength compared with PEG tubes. Clinical significance: Due to the increased load to failure as well as decreased placement time recorded for PRG tubes relative to PEG tubes, PRG tubes may be considered as an alternative minimally invasive gastrostomy option in large breed canine patients. Further evaluation in clinical animals is required. Results of this work were presented at the 2019 American College of Veterinary Surgeons Surgery Summit; October 16-19, 2019; Las Vegas, Nevada.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVeterinary Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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