Perceived vibriosis risk by Swedish rainbow trout net-pen farmers: Its effect on purchasing patterns and willingness-to-pay for vaccination

Margaret A. Thorburn, Tim Carpenter, Richard E. Plant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A mail questionnaire was submitted to all 38 brackish-water rainbow trout net-pen farmers on the south and east coasts of Sweden. One series of questions addressed farmers' willingness-to-pay pay (WTP) for vibriosis vaccination. The amount that experienced farmers are willing to pay for 100% vaccine efficacy (WTPF) was positively correlated with average annual vibrosis mortality rates. However, this correlation progressively decreased in magnitude as the annual posterior probability of vibriosis occurrence increased. Experienced farmers' WTP for partial vaccine efficacy (WTPP) was related to both average mortality rates and the range in the previous 2 years' annual vibriosis mortality rates. For farmers with low ranges, WTPP showed a strong negative correlation with mortality rates exceeding approximately 1-3%. For farmers with high ranges, the WTPP-mortality relationship was weakly negative. There was no significant linear relationship between WTP and the previous summer's vibriosis mortality rates for new farmers, but new farmers who had experience vibriosis were prepared to pay substantially more for vaccination than were vibriosis-free farmers. Results of a second series of questions showed a majority of respondents indicating an initial preference for rearing older fish (yearlings or 2-year-olds) would instead purchase younger fish (fingerlings or yearlings, respectively), if the younger fish were guaranteed vibriosis-resistant. All such farmers were prepared to pay at least the full cost of vaccination for this protection. Most farmers indicated that they do not purchase surplus juvenile fish in anticipation of vibriosis losses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-434
Number of pages16
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume4
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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