Perceived challenges to obtaining informed consent for a time-sensitive emergency department study of pediatric status epilepticus: Results of two focus groups

James M. Chamberlain, Kathleen Lillis, Cheryl Vance, Kathleen M. Brown, Olubunmi Fawumi, Shari Nichols, Colleen O. Davis, Tasmeen Singh, Jill M. Baren, N. Kuppermann, D. Alexander, E. Alpern, J. Chamberlain, J. M. Dean, M. Gerardi, J. Goepp, M. Gorelick, J. Hoyle, D. Jaffe, C. JohnsN. Levick, P. Mahajan, R. Maio, S. Miller, D. Monroe, R. Ruddy, R. Stanley, D. Treloar, M. Tunik, A. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The objective was to describe the perspective of research personnel on issues of informed consent in a time-sensitive clinical study under emergency circumstances. Methods: The authors convened concurrent focus groups of research staff and investigators involved in a pharmacokinetic study of lorazepam for status epilepticus (SE). Moderators led discussion with openended questions on selected issues of parental consent, communication and understanding, patient assent, and comparison to other types of studies. Focus group transcripts were analyzed to identify themes and subthemes from the discussions. Results: Most themes and subthemes were identified in both research staff and investigator focus groups. Focus group discussion points were categorized into three main themes: barriers to and enablers of informed consent, barriers to and enablers of actual enrollment, and overall ethical concerns about the research. Many of the issues identified were unique to emergency research. Conclusions: From the perspectives of research staff and investigators enrolling patients in a time-sensitive emergency department study, the authors identified several areas of concern that should be addressed when planning future emergency studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)763-770
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

Keywords

  • Clinical research
  • Consent documents
  • Informed consent
  • Research ethics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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    Chamberlain, J. M., Lillis, K., Vance, C., Brown, K. M., Fawumi, O., Nichols, S., Davis, C. O., Singh, T., Baren, J. M., Kuppermann, N., Alexander, D., Alpern, E., Chamberlain, J., Dean, J. M., Gerardi, M., Goepp, J., Gorelick, M., Hoyle, J., Jaffe, D., ... Walker, A. (2009). Perceived challenges to obtaining informed consent for a time-sensitive emergency department study of pediatric status epilepticus: Results of two focus groups. Academic Emergency Medicine, 16(8), 763-770. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00455.x