Pelvic organ prolapse surgery in the United States, 1997

Jeanette S. Brown, L Elaine Waetjen, Leslee L. Subak, David H. Thom, Stephen Van Den Eeden, Eric Vittinghoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

181 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to describe the prevalence, regional rates and demographic characteristics, morbidity, and mortality of pelvic organ prolapse surgeries in the United States. STUDY DESIGN: We used data from the 1997 National Hospital Discharge Survey and the 1997 National Census to calculate rates of pelvic organ prolapse surgeries by age, race, and regional trends. RESULTS: In 1997, 225,964 women underwent surgery for prolapse (22.7 per 10,000 women). The mean age of these women was 54.6 years (±15.2). The South had the highest rate of surgery (29.3 per 10,000) and the Northeast had the lowest (16.1 per 10,000). The surgery rate for whites (19.6 per 10,000) was 3 times greater than that for African Americans (6.4 per 10,000). Although 16% of surgeries had complications, mortality was rare (0.03%). CONCLUSION: Pelvic organ prolapse surgery is common. Regional and racial differences in rates of surgery may reflect physician practice, patient preferences, and gynecologic care utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-716
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume186
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Health Care Surveys
Mortality
Patient Preference
Prolapse
Censuses
African Americans
Demography
Morbidity
Physicians

Keywords

  • Pelvic floor
  • Prolapse
  • Surgery
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Uterine prolapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Brown, J. S., Waetjen, L. E., Subak, L. L., Thom, D. H., Van Den Eeden, S., & Vittinghoff, E. (2002). Pelvic organ prolapse surgery in the United States, 1997. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 186(4), 712-716. https://doi.org/10.1067/mob.2002.121897

Pelvic organ prolapse surgery in the United States, 1997. / Brown, Jeanette S.; Waetjen, L Elaine; Subak, Leslee L.; Thom, David H.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen; Vittinghoff, Eric.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 186, No. 4, 2002, p. 712-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, JS, Waetjen, LE, Subak, LL, Thom, DH, Van Den Eeden, S & Vittinghoff, E 2002, 'Pelvic organ prolapse surgery in the United States, 1997', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 186, no. 4, pp. 712-716. https://doi.org/10.1067/mob.2002.121897
Brown, Jeanette S. ; Waetjen, L Elaine ; Subak, Leslee L. ; Thom, David H. ; Van Den Eeden, Stephen ; Vittinghoff, Eric. / Pelvic organ prolapse surgery in the United States, 1997. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2002 ; Vol. 186, No. 4. pp. 712-716.
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