Pediatric trauma care: An overview of pediatric trauma systems and their practices in 18 US states

Maria Segui-Gomez, David C. Chang, Charles N. Paidas, Gregory Jurkovich, Ellen J. MacKenzie, Frederick P. Rivara

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the state of pediatric trauma system development in the United States in 1997 and 1998 and to characterize the hospitalization patterns of injured children in states with different types of pediatric trauma systems. The authors also investigated the impact of sociodemographic, injury, and geographic characteristics on those hospitalization patterns. Methods: The authors combined statewide hospital discharge data on hospitalized trauma patients less than 15 years old with data from the American Hospital Association, the Area Resource File, the Office of Management and Budget, the states' Departments of Health, and the US Census. Besides conducting descriptive analyses, the authors evaluated the role of several parameters in determining the likelihood of treatment in trauma and nontrauma centers using multivariate multinomial logistic regression models. Results: There were 15 states with adult and pediatric trauma designation systems; 9 of them had statewide hospital discharge data available. In these 9 states, 77% of the discharges were from trauma centers with no pediatric designation. More severely injured children and children with injuries to the head, face, thorax, and abdomen were more likely to be discharged from trauma centers, although large percentages of these children were treated in nontrauma centers. Older children and children with commercial insurance were less likely to be treated at trauma centers, even when injury severity, body region injured, and other factors were accounted for. Conclusions: Even in states with trauma systems, a large proportion of severely injured children are treated in nontrauma center facilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1162-1169
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Trauma Centers
Wounds and Injuries
Hospitalization
Office Management
Logistic Models
American Hospital Association
Body Regions
Budgets
Censuses
Insurance
Craniocerebral Trauma
Abdomen
Thorax
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Pediatric trauma
  • Trauma services
  • Trauma systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Pediatric trauma care : An overview of pediatric trauma systems and their practices in 18 US states. / Segui-Gomez, Maria; Chang, David C.; Paidas, Charles N.; Jurkovich, Gregory; MacKenzie, Ellen J.; Rivara, Frederick P.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 38, No. 8, 01.08.2003, p. 1162-1169.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Segui-Gomez, Maria ; Chang, David C. ; Paidas, Charles N. ; Jurkovich, Gregory ; MacKenzie, Ellen J. ; Rivara, Frederick P. / Pediatric trauma care : An overview of pediatric trauma systems and their practices in 18 US states. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 38, No. 8. pp. 1162-1169.
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