Pediatric intraocular lens power calculations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To implant an appropriate intraocular lens (IOL) in a child, we must measure the eye well, calculate the IOL power accurately and predict the refractive change of the pseudophakic eye to maturity. The present review will concentrate on recent studies dealing with these issues. RECENT FINDINGS: Immersion A-scan biometry is superior in measuring the axial length of children. Current IOL power calculation formulas are very accurate in adults, but significantly less accurate in children. Several studies point to the high prediction errors encountered particularly in shorter eyes with all available IOL formulas. Postoperative refraction target remains controversial, but low degrees of overcorrection (i.e. hyperopia) may not adversely affect eventual best-corrected visual acuity. SUMMARY: Although pediatric IOL power calculations suffer from significant prediction error, these errors can be decreased by careful preoperative measurements. IOL power calculation formulas are most accurate in the older, more 'adult'-sized eye. The smallest eyes have the most prediction error with all available formulas. Individual circumstances and parental concerns must be factored into the choice of a postoperative refractive target.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)388-393
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Ophthalmology
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Intraocular Lenses
Pediatrics
Biometry
Hyperopia
Immersion
Visual Acuity
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • intraocular lens power calculation
  • myopic shift
  • pediatric cataract surgery
  • pediatric intraocular lens implantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Pediatric intraocular lens power calculations. / O'Hara, Mary A.

In: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology, Vol. 23, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 388-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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