PCR multiplexed microsatellite panels to expedite canine genetic disease linkage analysis

M. L. Eggleston, D. N. Irion, A. L. Schaffer, S. S. Hughes, J. E. Draper, K. R. Robertson, L. V. Millon, Niels C Pedersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Modern dog breeds possess large numbers of genetic diseases for which there are currently few candidate genes or diagnostic tests. Linkage of a microsatellite marker to a disease phenotype is often the only available tool to aid in the development of screening tests for disease carriers. Detection of linkage to a specific disease phenotype requires screening of large numbers of markers across known affected and unaffected animals. To establish high throughput genome scanning this study placed 100 canine microsatellite markers, arranged by fragment size and fluorescent dye label, into 12 PCR multiplexed panels. The highest degree of multiplexing was 11 markers per panel while the lowest was five markers per panel; each panel was run in one gel lane on automated DNA sequencers. Selection of the markers was based upon chromosomal or linkage group locations, degree of polymorphism, PCR multiplex compatibility and ease of interpretation. The marker set has an average spacing of 22.25 centiMorgan (cM). Marker polymorphism was evaluated across 28 American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized breeds. The utility of buccal swab vs. blood samples was also validated in this study as all template DNA was derived from swabs obtained and submitted by participating dog breeders and owners. The PCR multiplexed microsatellite panels and sampling method described in this report will provide investigators with a cost effective and expedient means of pursuing linkage studies of specific canine genetic diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-235
Number of pages13
JournalAnimal Biotechnology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Dog Diseases
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Genetic Linkage
genetic disorders
Microsatellite Repeats
linkage (genetics)
microsatellite repeats
Polymerase Chain Reaction
dogs
genetic polymorphism
Dogs
screening
Phenotype
carrier state
phenotype
development aid
Polymorphism
Cheek
fluorescent dyes
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Canine DNA
  • Genome screen
  • Linkage
  • Microsatellites
  • Polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Eggleston, M. L., Irion, D. N., Schaffer, A. L., Hughes, S. S., Draper, J. E., Robertson, K. R., ... Pedersen, N. C. (2002). PCR multiplexed microsatellite panels to expedite canine genetic disease linkage analysis. Animal Biotechnology, 13(2), 223-235. https://doi.org/10.1081/ABIO-120016191

PCR multiplexed microsatellite panels to expedite canine genetic disease linkage analysis. / Eggleston, M. L.; Irion, D. N.; Schaffer, A. L.; Hughes, S. S.; Draper, J. E.; Robertson, K. R.; Millon, L. V.; Pedersen, Niels C.

In: Animal Biotechnology, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2002, p. 223-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eggleston, ML, Irion, DN, Schaffer, AL, Hughes, SS, Draper, JE, Robertson, KR, Millon, LV & Pedersen, NC 2002, 'PCR multiplexed microsatellite panels to expedite canine genetic disease linkage analysis', Animal Biotechnology, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 223-235. https://doi.org/10.1081/ABIO-120016191
Eggleston ML, Irion DN, Schaffer AL, Hughes SS, Draper JE, Robertson KR et al. PCR multiplexed microsatellite panels to expedite canine genetic disease linkage analysis. Animal Biotechnology. 2002;13(2):223-235. https://doi.org/10.1081/ABIO-120016191
Eggleston, M. L. ; Irion, D. N. ; Schaffer, A. L. ; Hughes, S. S. ; Draper, J. E. ; Robertson, K. R. ; Millon, L. V. ; Pedersen, Niels C. / PCR multiplexed microsatellite panels to expedite canine genetic disease linkage analysis. In: Animal Biotechnology. 2002 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 223-235.
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