Paying for the tolls: The high cost of the innate immune system for the cardiac myocyte

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cardiac myocyte differs strikingly from the specialized cells of the immune system, which has two different responses to invading organisms and tissue damage. Adaptive or acquired immunity generates highly specific antibodies in response to threats and is an essential component of immunity; however, adaptive immunity can take 4–7 days to mobilize, and a more primitive response, innate immunity, fills the gap. Innate immunity is expressed in complex and in primitive life forms. Specialized receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are widely distributed throughout different tissues recognize danger signals and rapidly respond with the release of noxious substances, such as TNFα. The problem is that many endogenous molecules have been found to act as ligands for specific TLRs, and when these molecules are released into the extracellular environment, they can cause problems by activating innate immunity and an inflammatory response. In cardiac myocytes heat shock protein (HSP)60 can activate TLR4, as can HMGB1, and this type of response can amplify the response to ischemia/reperfusion leading to increased cell and tissue injury. Activation of TLRs can potentially amplify chronic, inflammatory diseases, such as ischemic heart failure. Thus, it is important to understand the regulation of the TLRs and their downstream effects. This chapter will focus on the TLRs and cardiac myocytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages17-34
Number of pages18
Volume1003
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1003
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Immune system
Toll-Like Receptors
Cardiac Myocytes
Immune System
Costs and Cost Analysis
Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity
Costs
Tissue
HMGB1 Protein
Chaperonin 60
Molecules
Reperfusion
Antibody Formation
Immunity
Chronic Disease
Ischemia
Heart Failure
Chemical activation
Ligands

Keywords

  • Antibodies
  • Apoptosis
  • Cardiac myocytes
  • Heart failure
  • HSP60
  • HSP70
  • Inflammatory cytokines
  • Innate immunity
  • Necrosis
  • TLR2
  • TLR4
  • TNF
  • Toll-like receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Knowlton, A. A. (2017). Paying for the tolls: The high cost of the innate immune system for the cardiac myocyte. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Vol. 1003, pp. 17-34). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1003). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57613-8_2

Paying for the tolls : The high cost of the innate immune system for the cardiac myocyte. / Knowlton, Anne A.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 1003 Springer New York LLC, 2017. p. 17-34 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1003).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Knowlton, AA 2017, Paying for the tolls: The high cost of the innate immune system for the cardiac myocyte. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. vol. 1003, Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1003, Springer New York LLC, pp. 17-34. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57613-8_2
Knowlton AA. Paying for the tolls: The high cost of the innate immune system for the cardiac myocyte. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 1003. Springer New York LLC. 2017. p. 17-34. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57613-8_2
Knowlton, Anne A. / Paying for the tolls : The high cost of the innate immune system for the cardiac myocyte. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 1003 Springer New York LLC, 2017. pp. 17-34 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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