Patterns of chemotherapy use for women with ovarian cancer

A population-based study

Rosemary D Cress, Cynthia D. O'Malley, Gary S Leiserowitz, Sharon L. Campleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate adherence to published recommendations for chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients in the general community and to identify factors associated with its use. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of 2,150 women residing in Northern California with a first diagnosis of primary epithelial ovarian cancer between January 1994 and December 1996. Patients were identified through the California Cancer Registry and their physicians were surveyed to supplement registry treatment information. Results: Almost 89% of women younger than 75 years with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III or IV tumors received chemotherapy, with levels of treatment highest for women diagnosed at stage III. Patients 75 years of age and older were significantly less likely than younger women to receive chemotherapy (58.2% v 86.1%; P = .001) regardless of stage at diagnosis. Approximately 20% of patients younger than 55 years with early-stage (stage IC and II) cancer received no chemotherapy. Treatment in an American College of Surgeons hospital and treatment by a gynecologic oncologist increased the likelihood of receiving chemotherapy. Hospitalization for comorbid illness, race/ethnicity, census-based measures of socioeconomic status, and size or teaching status of hospital were all unrelated to probability of treatment after adjustment for other factors. Reasons reported most frequently by physicians for no treatment were lack of clinical indication and patient refusal. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that, despite scientific evidence and published guidelines that advocate chemotherapy for most women with ovarian cancer, some groups of women did not receive optimum treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1530-1535
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ovarian Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Population
Therapeutics
Registries
Physicians
Neoplasms
Censuses
Gynecology
Social Class
Teaching Hospitals
Obstetrics
Hospitalization
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Patterns of chemotherapy use for women with ovarian cancer : A population-based study. / Cress, Rosemary D; O'Malley, Cynthia D.; Leiserowitz, Gary S; Campleman, Sharon L.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 21, No. 8, 15.04.2003, p. 1530-1535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{17e75714d21b461385a8bb0ec663740a,
title = "Patterns of chemotherapy use for women with ovarian cancer: A population-based study",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate adherence to published recommendations for chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients in the general community and to identify factors associated with its use. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of 2,150 women residing in Northern California with a first diagnosis of primary epithelial ovarian cancer between January 1994 and December 1996. Patients were identified through the California Cancer Registry and their physicians were surveyed to supplement registry treatment information. Results: Almost 89{\%} of women younger than 75 years with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III or IV tumors received chemotherapy, with levels of treatment highest for women diagnosed at stage III. Patients 75 years of age and older were significantly less likely than younger women to receive chemotherapy (58.2{\%} v 86.1{\%}; P = .001) regardless of stage at diagnosis. Approximately 20{\%} of patients younger than 55 years with early-stage (stage IC and II) cancer received no chemotherapy. Treatment in an American College of Surgeons hospital and treatment by a gynecologic oncologist increased the likelihood of receiving chemotherapy. Hospitalization for comorbid illness, race/ethnicity, census-based measures of socioeconomic status, and size or teaching status of hospital were all unrelated to probability of treatment after adjustment for other factors. Reasons reported most frequently by physicians for no treatment were lack of clinical indication and patient refusal. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that, despite scientific evidence and published guidelines that advocate chemotherapy for most women with ovarian cancer, some groups of women did not receive optimum treatment.",
author = "Cress, {Rosemary D} and O'Malley, {Cynthia D.} and Leiserowitz, {Gary S} and Campleman, {Sharon L.}",
year = "2003",
month = "4",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1200/JCO.2003.08.065",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "1530--1535",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Oncology",
issn = "0732-183X",
publisher = "American Society of Clinical Oncology",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of chemotherapy use for women with ovarian cancer

T2 - A population-based study

AU - Cress, Rosemary D

AU - O'Malley, Cynthia D.

AU - Leiserowitz, Gary S

AU - Campleman, Sharon L.

PY - 2003/4/15

Y1 - 2003/4/15

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate adherence to published recommendations for chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients in the general community and to identify factors associated with its use. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of 2,150 women residing in Northern California with a first diagnosis of primary epithelial ovarian cancer between January 1994 and December 1996. Patients were identified through the California Cancer Registry and their physicians were surveyed to supplement registry treatment information. Results: Almost 89% of women younger than 75 years with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III or IV tumors received chemotherapy, with levels of treatment highest for women diagnosed at stage III. Patients 75 years of age and older were significantly less likely than younger women to receive chemotherapy (58.2% v 86.1%; P = .001) regardless of stage at diagnosis. Approximately 20% of patients younger than 55 years with early-stage (stage IC and II) cancer received no chemotherapy. Treatment in an American College of Surgeons hospital and treatment by a gynecologic oncologist increased the likelihood of receiving chemotherapy. Hospitalization for comorbid illness, race/ethnicity, census-based measures of socioeconomic status, and size or teaching status of hospital were all unrelated to probability of treatment after adjustment for other factors. Reasons reported most frequently by physicians for no treatment were lack of clinical indication and patient refusal. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that, despite scientific evidence and published guidelines that advocate chemotherapy for most women with ovarian cancer, some groups of women did not receive optimum treatment.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate adherence to published recommendations for chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients in the general community and to identify factors associated with its use. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of 2,150 women residing in Northern California with a first diagnosis of primary epithelial ovarian cancer between January 1994 and December 1996. Patients were identified through the California Cancer Registry and their physicians were surveyed to supplement registry treatment information. Results: Almost 89% of women younger than 75 years with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III or IV tumors received chemotherapy, with levels of treatment highest for women diagnosed at stage III. Patients 75 years of age and older were significantly less likely than younger women to receive chemotherapy (58.2% v 86.1%; P = .001) regardless of stage at diagnosis. Approximately 20% of patients younger than 55 years with early-stage (stage IC and II) cancer received no chemotherapy. Treatment in an American College of Surgeons hospital and treatment by a gynecologic oncologist increased the likelihood of receiving chemotherapy. Hospitalization for comorbid illness, race/ethnicity, census-based measures of socioeconomic status, and size or teaching status of hospital were all unrelated to probability of treatment after adjustment for other factors. Reasons reported most frequently by physicians for no treatment were lack of clinical indication and patient refusal. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that, despite scientific evidence and published guidelines that advocate chemotherapy for most women with ovarian cancer, some groups of women did not receive optimum treatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038518564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038518564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1200/JCO.2003.08.065

DO - 10.1200/JCO.2003.08.065

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 1530

EP - 1535

JO - Journal of Clinical Oncology

JF - Journal of Clinical Oncology

SN - 0732-183X

IS - 8

ER -