Patterning cells on optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes

Sunny Shah, Alexander Revzin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability to exercise precise spatial and temporal control over cell-surface interactions is an important prerequisite to the assembly of multi-cellular constructs serving as in vitro mimics of native tissues. In this study, photolithography and wet etching techniques were used to fabricate individually addressable indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes on glass substrates. The glass substrates containing ITO microelectrodes were modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane to make them protein and cell resistive. Presence of insulating PEG molecules on the electrode surface was verified by cyclic voltammetry employing potassium ferricyanide as a redox reporter molecule. Importantly, the application of reductive potential caused desorption of the PEG layer, resulting in regeneration of the conductive electrode surface and appearance of typical ferricyanide redox peaks. Application of reductive potential also corresponded to switching of ITO electrode properties from cell non-adhesive to cell-adhesive. Electrochemical stripping of PEG-silane layer from ITO microelectrodes allowed for cell adhesion to take place in a spatially defined fashion, with cellular patterns corresponding closely to electrode patterns. Micropatterning of several cell types was demonstrated on these substrates. In the future, the control of the biointerfacial properties afforded by this method will allow to engineer cellular microenvironments through the assembly of three or more cell types into a precise geometric configuration on an optically transparent substrate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere259
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Fingerprint

Tin oxides
Indium
Polyethylene glycols
Electrodes
Microelectrodes
Substrates
Silanes
Oxidation-Reduction
Glass
Cellular Microenvironment
Molecules
Wet etching
Cell adhesion
Photolithography
Cell Adhesion
Cell Communication
Adhesives
Cyclic voltammetry
Potassium
Regeneration

Keywords

  • Cell patterning
  • Cellular biology
  • Electrochemistry
  • Indium tin oxide
  • Issue 7
  • Surface modification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Patterning cells on optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes. / Shah, Sunny; Revzin, Alexander.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 7, e259, 08.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{82462b8c2ac54808b11cbaed17ccb583,
title = "Patterning cells on optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes",
abstract = "The ability to exercise precise spatial and temporal control over cell-surface interactions is an important prerequisite to the assembly of multi-cellular constructs serving as in vitro mimics of native tissues. In this study, photolithography and wet etching techniques were used to fabricate individually addressable indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes on glass substrates. The glass substrates containing ITO microelectrodes were modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane to make them protein and cell resistive. Presence of insulating PEG molecules on the electrode surface was verified by cyclic voltammetry employing potassium ferricyanide as a redox reporter molecule. Importantly, the application of reductive potential caused desorption of the PEG layer, resulting in regeneration of the conductive electrode surface and appearance of typical ferricyanide redox peaks. Application of reductive potential also corresponded to switching of ITO electrode properties from cell non-adhesive to cell-adhesive. Electrochemical stripping of PEG-silane layer from ITO microelectrodes allowed for cell adhesion to take place in a spatially defined fashion, with cellular patterns corresponding closely to electrode patterns. Micropatterning of several cell types was demonstrated on these substrates. In the future, the control of the biointerfacial properties afforded by this method will allow to engineer cellular microenvironments through the assembly of three or more cell types into a precise geometric configuration on an optically transparent substrate.",
keywords = "Cell patterning, Cellular biology, Electrochemistry, Indium tin oxide, Issue 7, Surface modification",
author = "Sunny Shah and Alexander Revzin",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
doi = "10.3791/259",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Visualized Experiments",
issn = "1940-087X",
publisher = "MYJoVE Corporation",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterning cells on optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes

AU - Shah, Sunny

AU - Revzin, Alexander

PY - 2007/8

Y1 - 2007/8

N2 - The ability to exercise precise spatial and temporal control over cell-surface interactions is an important prerequisite to the assembly of multi-cellular constructs serving as in vitro mimics of native tissues. In this study, photolithography and wet etching techniques were used to fabricate individually addressable indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes on glass substrates. The glass substrates containing ITO microelectrodes were modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane to make them protein and cell resistive. Presence of insulating PEG molecules on the electrode surface was verified by cyclic voltammetry employing potassium ferricyanide as a redox reporter molecule. Importantly, the application of reductive potential caused desorption of the PEG layer, resulting in regeneration of the conductive electrode surface and appearance of typical ferricyanide redox peaks. Application of reductive potential also corresponded to switching of ITO electrode properties from cell non-adhesive to cell-adhesive. Electrochemical stripping of PEG-silane layer from ITO microelectrodes allowed for cell adhesion to take place in a spatially defined fashion, with cellular patterns corresponding closely to electrode patterns. Micropatterning of several cell types was demonstrated on these substrates. In the future, the control of the biointerfacial properties afforded by this method will allow to engineer cellular microenvironments through the assembly of three or more cell types into a precise geometric configuration on an optically transparent substrate.

AB - The ability to exercise precise spatial and temporal control over cell-surface interactions is an important prerequisite to the assembly of multi-cellular constructs serving as in vitro mimics of native tissues. In this study, photolithography and wet etching techniques were used to fabricate individually addressable indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes on glass substrates. The glass substrates containing ITO microelectrodes were modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane to make them protein and cell resistive. Presence of insulating PEG molecules on the electrode surface was verified by cyclic voltammetry employing potassium ferricyanide as a redox reporter molecule. Importantly, the application of reductive potential caused desorption of the PEG layer, resulting in regeneration of the conductive electrode surface and appearance of typical ferricyanide redox peaks. Application of reductive potential also corresponded to switching of ITO electrode properties from cell non-adhesive to cell-adhesive. Electrochemical stripping of PEG-silane layer from ITO microelectrodes allowed for cell adhesion to take place in a spatially defined fashion, with cellular patterns corresponding closely to electrode patterns. Micropatterning of several cell types was demonstrated on these substrates. In the future, the control of the biointerfacial properties afforded by this method will allow to engineer cellular microenvironments through the assembly of three or more cell types into a precise geometric configuration on an optically transparent substrate.

KW - Cell patterning

KW - Cellular biology

KW - Electrochemistry

KW - Indium tin oxide

KW - Issue 7

KW - Surface modification

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80355126491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80355126491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3791/259

DO - 10.3791/259

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Visualized Experiments

JF - Journal of Visualized Experiments

SN - 1940-087X

IS - 7

M1 - e259

ER -