Patients with recognized psychiatric disorders in trauma surgery: Incidence, inpatient length of stay, and cost

Douglas F. Zatzick, Sun Mee Kang, Su Yeong Kim, J Paul Leigh, Richard L Kravitz, Christina Drake, Stanley Sue, David H Wisner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although psychiatric disturbances are highly prevalent among traumatically injured inpatients, few investigations have assessed the impact of these disorders on surgical length of stay (LOS) and cost. Methods: The authors identified all trauma-registry recorded psychiatric diagnoses among patients admitted to University of California Davis Medical Center between January 1993 and December 1996. Linear and logistic regressions were used to assess the unique effects of psychiatric diagnoses on inpatient LOS and cost. Results: A total of 29% of patients had one or more registry-recorded psychiatric diagnosis. Patients with alcohol abuse diagnoses demonstrated 10% to 12% decreases in LOS and cost (p < 0.01), whereas patients with stress disorders, delirium, and psychoses demonstrated 46% to 103% increases in LOS and cost (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Patients with recognized psychiatric disorders uniquely impact inpatient trauma surgery LOS and cost. Additional investigations of the processes and outcomes of care could lead to cost-effective performance improvement efforts that target the amelioration of co-morbid psychiatric disorders among physically injured trauma survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-495
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume49
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Psychiatry
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Mental Disorders
Registries
Delirium
Psychotic Disorders
Alcoholism
Survivors
Linear Models
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Cost
  • Injury severity
  • Length of stay
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Psychiatric diagnoses
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Patients with recognized psychiatric disorders in trauma surgery : Incidence, inpatient length of stay, and cost. / Zatzick, Douglas F.; Kang, Sun Mee; Kim, Su Yeong; Leigh, J Paul; Kravitz, Richard L; Drake, Christina; Sue, Stanley; Wisner, David H.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 49, No. 3, 2000, p. 487-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Sue, Stanley

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