Patients' perception of stopping or continuing treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin type A

Allison Brashear, Kathleen Bergan, Joanne Wojcieszek, Eric R. Siemers, Walter Ambrosius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite widespread commercial acceptance of botulinum toxin (BTX) for idiopathic cervical dystonia (ICD), no follow up has been performed to determine when and why some patients stop therapy. It has been suggested that some patients who stop BTX treatment may do so because of permanent improvement. We surveyed 155 patients with ICD who were treated over 6 years with BTX to determine when and why patients stopped treatment with BTX, and what adverse events and changes in dose and/or frequency of treatments occurred in those who continued treatment. Of the 133 (86.6%) individuals returning the surveys, 104 continued on BTX treatment and 29 had stopped therapy. Of the 29 subjects no longer receiving BTX, 11 individuals had only received one or two injections. Prior surgical treatment for ICD did not influence their decision to stop therapy. Of those 104 of 133 continuing on BTX treatments, two thirds of the subjects reported the injections always help, whereas one quarter estimated one set of injections did not help. One third of those continuing treatment reported the first injection was most helpful, whereas another one third felt all injections were similarly effective. After an initial adjustment, BTX dosages and frequency of treatment remained stable in this group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-153
Number of pages4
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 20 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Torticollis
Type A Botulinum Toxins
Botulinum Toxins
Therapeutics
Injections
Social Adjustment

Keywords

  • Botulinum toxin
  • Cervical dystonia
  • Torticollis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Patients' perception of stopping or continuing treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin type A. / Brashear, Allison; Bergan, Kathleen; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Siemers, Eric R.; Ambrosius, Walter.

In: Movement Disorders, Vol. 15, No. 1, 20.01.2000, p. 150-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brashear, Allison ; Bergan, Kathleen ; Wojcieszek, Joanne ; Siemers, Eric R. ; Ambrosius, Walter. / Patients' perception of stopping or continuing treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin type A. In: Movement Disorders. 2000 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 150-153.
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