Patient Positioning, Port Placement, and Access Techniques for Thoracoscopic Surgery

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although morbidity associated with thoracoscopic port placement is less frequently reported compared with laparoscopic port placement, poor technique during establishment of thoracic access for minimally invasive procedures can have serious consequences. Most commonly, thoracoscopic access is established either from a subxiphoid or intercostal approach using either an open or optical approach. Instrument ports are always placed under direct visualization to avoid morbidity. The most common complications associated with thoracoscopic access are intercostal vessel hemorrhage and lung laceration, although both are uncommon. Postoperative complications can include seroma formation or infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSmall Animal Laparoscopy and Thoracoscopy
Publisherwiley
Pages271-276
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781118845912
ISBN (Print)9781118845967
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 6 2015

Fingerprint

thoracoscopy
Patient Positioning
Thoracoscopy
morbidity
Morbidity
lacerations
Seroma
postoperative complications
Lacerations
chest
hemorrhage
Thorax
lungs
Hemorrhage
Lung
Infection
methodology
infection

Keywords

  • Cannula
  • Intercostal
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Subxiphoid
  • Thoracoscopy
  • Veress needle
  • Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Patient Positioning, Port Placement, and Access Techniques for Thoracoscopic Surgery. / Mayhew, Philipp; Culp, William T.

Small Animal Laparoscopy and Thoracoscopy. wiley, 2015. p. 271-276.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

@inbook{04b84cca2be543f1be6523ed36de6e71,
title = "Patient Positioning, Port Placement, and Access Techniques for Thoracoscopic Surgery",
abstract = "Although morbidity associated with thoracoscopic port placement is less frequently reported compared with laparoscopic port placement, poor technique during establishment of thoracic access for minimally invasive procedures can have serious consequences. Most commonly, thoracoscopic access is established either from a subxiphoid or intercostal approach using either an open or optical approach. Instrument ports are always placed under direct visualization to avoid morbidity. The most common complications associated with thoracoscopic access are intercostal vessel hemorrhage and lung laceration, although both are uncommon. Postoperative complications can include seroma formation or infection.",
keywords = "Cannula, Intercostal, Minimally invasive surgery, Subxiphoid, Thoracoscopy, Veress needle, Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery",
author = "Philipp Mayhew and Culp, {William T}",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1002/9781118845912.ch30",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781118845967",
pages = "271--276",
booktitle = "Small Animal Laparoscopy and Thoracoscopy",
publisher = "wiley",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Patient Positioning, Port Placement, and Access Techniques for Thoracoscopic Surgery

AU - Mayhew, Philipp

AU - Culp, William T

PY - 2015/11/6

Y1 - 2015/11/6

N2 - Although morbidity associated with thoracoscopic port placement is less frequently reported compared with laparoscopic port placement, poor technique during establishment of thoracic access for minimally invasive procedures can have serious consequences. Most commonly, thoracoscopic access is established either from a subxiphoid or intercostal approach using either an open or optical approach. Instrument ports are always placed under direct visualization to avoid morbidity. The most common complications associated with thoracoscopic access are intercostal vessel hemorrhage and lung laceration, although both are uncommon. Postoperative complications can include seroma formation or infection.

AB - Although morbidity associated with thoracoscopic port placement is less frequently reported compared with laparoscopic port placement, poor technique during establishment of thoracic access for minimally invasive procedures can have serious consequences. Most commonly, thoracoscopic access is established either from a subxiphoid or intercostal approach using either an open or optical approach. Instrument ports are always placed under direct visualization to avoid morbidity. The most common complications associated with thoracoscopic access are intercostal vessel hemorrhage and lung laceration, although both are uncommon. Postoperative complications can include seroma formation or infection.

KW - Cannula

KW - Intercostal

KW - Minimally invasive surgery

KW - Subxiphoid

KW - Thoracoscopy

KW - Veress needle

KW - Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020324156&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020324156&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/9781118845912.ch30

DO - 10.1002/9781118845912.ch30

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781118845967

SP - 271

EP - 276

BT - Small Animal Laparoscopy and Thoracoscopy

PB - wiley

ER -