Patient and lesion-specific characteristics predict risk of major adverse cardiovascular events among patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention undergoing noncardiac surgery

Ehrin J. Armstrong, Laura Graham, Stephen W. Waldo, Javier A. Valle, Thomas M. Maddox, Mary T. Hawn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To identify predictors of major adverse cardiovascular outcomes (MACE) among patients with prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) who require noncardiac surgery. Background: Patients with prior PCI who undergo noncardiac surgery have an increased risk of postoperative MACE, but few studies have examined the association of PCI lesion characteristics with subsequent operative risk. Methods: Patients were identified using the VA Clinical Assessment, Reporting, and Tracking (CART) program. Patients who underwent noncardiac surgery within 2 years after stent placement were linked to VA and non-VA surgical records. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed to identify predictors of postoperative MACE. Results: Among 12,621 patients with a history of prior PCI who underwent subsequent noncardiac surgery, 570 (4.5%) developed postoperative MACE. The median time from stent placement to surgery was 368 days (IQR 181-528). The strongest predictors of postoperative MACE were urgency of the operation, revised cardiac risk index, the indication for the prior PCI, and timing of the surgery after the PCI. Lesion characteristics independently associated with postoperative MACE included PCI to a distal (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 1.11-1.83) or ostial lesion (AOR 1.52, 95% CI 1.11-2.08), and lesion calcification (AOR 1.29, 95% CI 1.03-1.61), but stent length and target vessel were not independently associated with outcomes. Placement of a bare metal stent was also an independent predictor of MACE after noncardiac surgery (AOR 1.29, 95% CI 1.06-1.57). Conclusions: While patient and operative characteristics are the strongest predictors of MACE after noncardiac surgery, specific lesion characteristics including ostial or distal lesion location and calcification are novel risk factors for postoperative MACE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Operative risk
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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