Pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis infection in laying chickens. I. Studies on egg transmission, clinical signs, fecal shedding, and serologic responses.

H L Shivaprasad, J. F. Timoney, S. Morales, B. Lucio, R. C. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

169 Scopus citations

Abstract

Laying hens were inoculated orally, intracloacally (IC), or intravenously (IV) with Salmonella enteritidis phage type 8 isolates from a human (E700-87) eggs (Y-8P2), or the ovary of a hen (27A). Oral or IV inoculation of 2 x 10(8) to 4 x 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) of E700-87 caused depression, anorexia, reduced egg production, diarrhea, and some mortality. Lower doses resulted in milder clinical signs. S. enteritidis was cultured from the shells of a few eggs but not from egg contents. Fecal shedding persisted for up to 6 weeks in some birds. Isolate Y-8P2 (10(6) CFU) also caused anorexia, diarrhea, and a drop in egg production. Hens inoculated orally or IC were less severely affected than those inoculated IV. Fecal shedding was intermittent and lasted up to 18 days. Eggshells from the IC-inoculated birds had the highest rate of contamination, and S. enteritidis was isolated from the albumen of 11 and yolk of three of 726 eggs. Oral inoculation of 10(6) CFU of isolate 27A resulted in a bacteremic infection with seeding of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, ovule, and oviduct. However, the birds remained clinically normal with normal egg production. S. enteritidis was cultured from the yolk and albumen of a small number of eggs until 11 days postinfection. Antigen prepared from S. enteritidis detected antibody in more sera than did commercially available S. pullorum antigen in agglutination tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-557
Number of pages10
JournalAvian Diseases
Volume34
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

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