Passive transfer, rate of decay, and protein specificity of antibodies against equine arteritis virus in horses from a Standardbred herd with high seroprevalence

Pam Hullinger, William D Wilson, Paul V. Rossitto, John F. Patton, Mark Thurmond, Nigel J Maclachlan

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33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine rate of decay of passively acquired antibodies in Standardbred foals on a farm with a high seroprevalence to equine arteritis virus (EAV) and to determine whether vertical or horizontal transmission of the virus was responsible for infection on the farm. Design - Repeated-measures study. Animals - 46 Standardbred horses (15 brood mares and their foals, 5 stallions, and 11 young horses). Procedure - Serum samples obtained from horses on the farm were evaluated by serum neutralization and western immunoblot analysis to detect EAV-specific antibodies. The half-life of passively acquired antibodies in foals was estimated by use of regression analysis. Results - Most (14/15) of the mares evaluated were seropositive to EAV. After suckling, their foals were also seropositive. Mean biological half-life for passively acquired antibodies in serum samples obtained from foals was 32 days (r2 = 0.61). The foal born to a seronegative dam and all 11 young horses from the farm were seronegative to EAV. At least 2 of 5 stallions on the farm were persistently infected carriers that were shedding virus in their semen. Immunoblot analysis of seropositive serum samples most consistently recognized the M protein of EAV. Clinical Implications - Analysis of these data indicated that a modified-live EAV vaccine can be administered to foals after they are 8 months old without risk of interference from maternal antibodies, regardless of serologic status of the foal's dam. Horizontal transmission of EAV via the respiratory tract apparently was uncommon on the farm, indicating that mares primarily were infected by venereal transmission of virus from carrier stallions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)839-842
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume213
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 15 1998

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Equine Arteritis Virus
Equine arteritis virus
Antibody Specificity
Standardbred
Seroepidemiologic Studies
foals
seroprevalence
Horses
herds
deterioration
horses
Antibodies
farms
Proteins
stallions
proteins
mares
Serum
antibodies
Half-Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Passive transfer, rate of decay, and protein specificity of antibodies against equine arteritis virus in horses from a Standardbred herd with high seroprevalence",
abstract = "Objective - To determine rate of decay of passively acquired antibodies in Standardbred foals on a farm with a high seroprevalence to equine arteritis virus (EAV) and to determine whether vertical or horizontal transmission of the virus was responsible for infection on the farm. Design - Repeated-measures study. Animals - 46 Standardbred horses (15 brood mares and their foals, 5 stallions, and 11 young horses). Procedure - Serum samples obtained from horses on the farm were evaluated by serum neutralization and western immunoblot analysis to detect EAV-specific antibodies. The half-life of passively acquired antibodies in foals was estimated by use of regression analysis. Results - Most (14/15) of the mares evaluated were seropositive to EAV. After suckling, their foals were also seropositive. Mean biological half-life for passively acquired antibodies in serum samples obtained from foals was 32 days (r2 = 0.61). The foal born to a seronegative dam and all 11 young horses from the farm were seronegative to EAV. At least 2 of 5 stallions on the farm were persistently infected carriers that were shedding virus in their semen. Immunoblot analysis of seropositive serum samples most consistently recognized the M protein of EAV. Clinical Implications - Analysis of these data indicated that a modified-live EAV vaccine can be administered to foals after they are 8 months old without risk of interference from maternal antibodies, regardless of serologic status of the foal's dam. Horizontal transmission of EAV via the respiratory tract apparently was uncommon on the farm, indicating that mares primarily were infected by venereal transmission of virus from carrier stallions.",
author = "Pam Hullinger and Wilson, {William D} and Rossitto, {Paul V.} and Patton, {John F.} and Mark Thurmond and Maclachlan, {Nigel J}",
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T1 - Passive transfer, rate of decay, and protein specificity of antibodies against equine arteritis virus in horses from a Standardbred herd with high seroprevalence

AU - Hullinger, Pam

AU - Wilson, William D

AU - Rossitto, Paul V.

AU - Patton, John F.

AU - Thurmond, Mark

AU - Maclachlan, Nigel J

PY - 1998/9/15

Y1 - 1998/9/15

N2 - Objective - To determine rate of decay of passively acquired antibodies in Standardbred foals on a farm with a high seroprevalence to equine arteritis virus (EAV) and to determine whether vertical or horizontal transmission of the virus was responsible for infection on the farm. Design - Repeated-measures study. Animals - 46 Standardbred horses (15 brood mares and their foals, 5 stallions, and 11 young horses). Procedure - Serum samples obtained from horses on the farm were evaluated by serum neutralization and western immunoblot analysis to detect EAV-specific antibodies. The half-life of passively acquired antibodies in foals was estimated by use of regression analysis. Results - Most (14/15) of the mares evaluated were seropositive to EAV. After suckling, their foals were also seropositive. Mean biological half-life for passively acquired antibodies in serum samples obtained from foals was 32 days (r2 = 0.61). The foal born to a seronegative dam and all 11 young horses from the farm were seronegative to EAV. At least 2 of 5 stallions on the farm were persistently infected carriers that were shedding virus in their semen. Immunoblot analysis of seropositive serum samples most consistently recognized the M protein of EAV. Clinical Implications - Analysis of these data indicated that a modified-live EAV vaccine can be administered to foals after they are 8 months old without risk of interference from maternal antibodies, regardless of serologic status of the foal's dam. Horizontal transmission of EAV via the respiratory tract apparently was uncommon on the farm, indicating that mares primarily were infected by venereal transmission of virus from carrier stallions.

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