Passive and active mechanical properties of the superficial and deep digital flexor muscles in the forelimbs of anesthetized Thoroughbred horses

Michael D. Swanstrom, Laura Zarucco, Susan M Stover, Mont Hubbard, David A. Hawkins, Bernd Driessen, Eugene Steffey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The superficial (SDF) and deep digital flexor (DDF) muscles are critical for equine forelimb locomotion. Knowledge of their mechanical properties will enhance our understanding of limb biomechanics. Muscle contractile properties derived from architectural-based algorithms may overestimate real forces and underestimate shortening capacity because of simplistic assumptions regarding muscle architecture. Therefore, passive and active (=total - passive) force-length properties of the SDF and DDF muscles were measured directly in vivo. Muscles from the right forelimbs of four Thoroughbred horses were evaluated during general anesthesia. Limbs were fixed to an external frame with the muscle attached to a linear actuator and load cell. Each muscle was stretched from an unloaded state to a range of prefixed lengths, then stimulated while held at that length. The total force did not exceed 4000N, the limit for the clamping device. The SDF and DDF muscles produced 716±192 and 1577±203N maximum active isometric force (Fmax), had ascending force-length ranges (Rasc) of 5.1±0.2 and 9.1±0.4cm, and had passive stiffnesses of 1186±104 and 1132±51N/cm, respectively. The values measured for Fmax were much smaller than predicted based on conservative estimates of muscle specific tension and muscle physiological cross-sectional area. Rasc were much larger than predicted based on muscle fiber length estimates. These data suggest that accurate prediction of the active mechanical behavior of architecturally complex muscles such as the equine DDF and SDF requires more sophisticated algorithms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)579-586
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Fingerprint

Forelimb
Horses
Muscle
Muscles
Mechanical properties
Extremities
Muscle Tonus
Linear actuators
Biomechanics
Locomotion
Clamping devices
Biomechanical Phenomena
Constriction
General Anesthesia
Stiffness

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Contractile properties
  • Isometric
  • Modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Passive and active mechanical properties of the superficial and deep digital flexor muscles in the forelimbs of anesthetized Thoroughbred horses. / Swanstrom, Michael D.; Zarucco, Laura; Stover, Susan M; Hubbard, Mont; Hawkins, David A.; Driessen, Bernd; Steffey, Eugene.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 38, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 579-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swanstrom, Michael D. ; Zarucco, Laura ; Stover, Susan M ; Hubbard, Mont ; Hawkins, David A. ; Driessen, Bernd ; Steffey, Eugene. / Passive and active mechanical properties of the superficial and deep digital flexor muscles in the forelimbs of anesthetized Thoroughbred horses. In: Journal of Biomechanics. 2005 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 579-586.
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