Participant satisfaction with appearance-based versus health-based educational videos promoting sunscreen use: A randomized controlled trial

William Tuong, April W. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Increasing participant satisfaction with health interventions can improve compliance with recommended health behaviors and lead to better health outcomes. However, factors that influence participant satisfaction have not been well studied in dermatology-specific behavioral health interventions. We sought to assess participant satisfaction of either an appearance-based educational video or a health-based educational video promoting sunscreen use along dimensions of usefulness of educational content, message appeal, and presentation quality. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, participants were randomized 1:1 to view an appearance-based video or a health-based video. After six weeks, participant satisfaction with the educational videos was assessed. Results: Fifty high school students were enrolled and completed the study. Participant satisfaction ratings were assessed using a pre-tested 10-point assessment scale. The participants rated the usefulness of the appearance-based video (8.1 ± 1.2) significantly higher than the health-based video (6.4 ± 1.4, p<0.001). The message appeal of the appearance-based video (8.3 ± 1.0) was also significantly higher than the health-based video (6.6 ± 1.6, p<0.001). The presentation quality rating was similar between the appearance-based video (7.8 ± 1.3) and the health-based video (8.1 ± 1.3), p=0.676. Conclusions: Adolescents rated the appearance-based video higher than the health-based video in terms of usefulness of educational content and message appeal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalDermatology Online Journal
Volume21
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sunscreening Agents
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health
Health Behavior
Dermatology
Students

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Patient satisfaction
  • Sun protection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Participant satisfaction with appearance-based versus health-based educational videos promoting sunscreen use : A randomized controlled trial. / Tuong, William; Armstrong, April W.

In: Dermatology Online Journal, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2015, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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